Takejiro Hasegawa/Kobunsha Publications
"Chirimen-bon" (Crepe Paper Books)
And Plain Paper Books

 


Buying. We are actively buying the Hasegawa/Kobunsha color woodblock print books. If you have material to sell, please contact us. All the books below, and any others, are of interest. A more detailed listing of our buying interest is here.

Selling. If we have a book in stock, a link to the offering is provided.


 

 
Takejiro Hasegawa (1853-1938) had a long association with Western missionaries and Westerners in Tokyo. It is through this association that he started printing woodblock illustrated books in the Western languages. Initially Hasegawa's books were published under the "Kobunsha" imprint (Minami Saegi-cho and Maruya-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo) but in the 1889-1890 period the name was changed to T. Hasegawa (Hasegawa & Co.) and a number of addresses appear over the years. Books are found that were published ca 1928 which bear the imprint of "T. Hasegawa & Son, Publishers & Art Printers" or "T. Hasegawa & Son" with the 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo address. On Hasegawa's death in 1939 (but perhaps as early as 1917/18) the firm operated under the name of Hasegawa and Nishinomiya, and subsequently Nishinomiya and Hasegawa.

According to Frederic A. Sharf, Hasegawa's first publication was a black and white woodblock book of Hokusai's masterpieces and that was followed by a two volume set titled Writings of Buddha which was copyrighted with the Kobunsha imprint in November of 1884. It was the next year that he launched his now famous Fairy Tale Series. It appears that most of Hasegawa's books were produced in limited amounts, generally four to five hundred at a run. Hasegawa's business also produced post cards and minitature post card size art reproductions, (example here and here), large size reproductions of art (Ukiyo-e Masterpieces), calendars, albums of prints, menus and individual prints. The focus of the Hasegawa enterprise from 1885 though the mid-1920s was the color woodblock illustrated book and calendars. During the 1920s the focus began to move toward color woodblock prints, individually or in sets. Sometimes called Hasegawa Publishing Co., Nishinomiya marketed and extensive inventory of "Japanese Colour Prints, Reproductions of the Old Masterpieces, Hand-painted from Coloured Woodcuts." Under the Nishinomiya name, Hasegawa marketed a famous "Night Scene" series of prints. The Nishinomiya firm continued to market a variety of the existing Hasegawa books, often in sets and mostly the crepe paper versions. Nishinomiya also reprinted some of the Fairy Tale Series (No 10, The Matsuyama Mirror confirmed).

Hasegawa used the printing services of the Tokyo Tsukiji Type Foundry for some of his books.

In addition to the color woodblock books, Kobunsha also printed black and white illustrated books aimed at the Japanese market. A series known as the The Kobunsha Language Series was produced for the Japanese market. In about 1887 Kobunsha produced an illustrated (black and white) educational children's' textbook for the American company of Charles J. Barnes.

A listing of T. Hasegawa publications published in 1906 is here. A more extensive, but undated, listing is posted here (external web page).

Information regarding factors I consider important in evaluating the condition of these T. Hasegawa books is here.

 

Kobunsha/Hasegawa
Japanese Fairy Tale Series


Japanese Fairy Tale Series

 
The Kobunsha/Hasegawa Fairy Tale books are:

First (Original) Series

No 1. Little Peachling (18 pp & 22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Momotaro (Type A Cover)

           2nd Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - Momotaro (Type A2 Cover)

           2nd Edition, Later Printings, c1886~c1887, Plain Paper - Momotaro (Type A2 Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - Momotaro (22 pp)

           c1911 Reprint - Momotaro (22 pp)

No 2. Tongue-Cut Sparrow (22 pp & 24 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, First Printing, String Ties, Plain Paper - Shitakiri Suzume (Type A Cover)

           1st Edition, 1886, Second Printing, Stab Ties, Plain Paper - Shitakiri Suzume (Type A Cover)

           2nd Edition, 1886, Stab Ties, Plain Paper - Tongue Cut Sparrow (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - Tongue Cut Sparrow

           c1898 Hasegawa Reprint - Tongue Cut Sparrow

           c1911 Hasegawa Reprint - Tongue Cut Sparrow (Type a - 22 pp)

           c1911 Hasegawa Reprint - Tongue Cut Sparrow (Type b - 24 pp)

No 3. Battle of the Monkey and the Crab (18 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Saru Kani Kassen (Type A Cover)

           2nd Edition, 1886, Plain Paper, - Saru Kani Kassen (Type A1 Cover)

           2nd Edition, 1886, Plain Paper, - Battle of the Monkey & Crab (Type B Cover)

           2nd Edition, c1895, Crepe Paper, - Battle of the Monkey & Crab (Type B Cover)

           1886 Griffith Farran & Co. Printing - Battle of the Monkey & Crab

           c1903 Hasegawa Reprint - Battle of the Monkey & Crab

           c1911 Hasegawa & c1930 Nishinomiya Reprints - Battle of the Monkey & Crab

No 4. The Old Man Who Made the Dead Trees Blossom (18 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Hanasaki Jiji (Type A & A1 Covers)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Old Man Who Made Dead Trees Blossom
            (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - Old Man Who Made Dead Trees Blossom

           c1911 Hasegawa Reprint - Old Man Who Made Dead Trees Blossom

No 5. Kachi-Kachi Mountain (28 pp & 22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Kachi-Kachi Yama (Type A & A2 Cover)

           c1888 Reprint - Kachi-Kachi Yama (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - Kachi-Kachi Mountain (22 pp)

           c1898 Reprint - Kachi-Kachi Mountain (22 pp)

           1955 Reprint - Kachi-Kachi Mountain (22 pp) (Y. Nishinomiyo)

No 6. The Mouse's Wedding (24 pp & 22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1885, Plain Paper - Nedzumi no Yomeiri (Type A Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1886, Plain Paper - Nedzumi no Yomeiri (Type A2 Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1886, Plain Paper - Mouse's Wedding (Type B Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1888, Plain Paper - Mouse's Wedding (Type B Cover)

           c1911 Reprint (Types a and b) - Mouse's Wedding (22 pp)

         (First editions (English) of No. 1 ~ No. 6 completed 1885)
         (No. 1 ~ No. 6 in black and white only with brown covers completed 1885)

No 7. The Old Man and the Devils (22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - The Old Man & the Devils (Type B1 Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Old Man & the Devils

           c1898 and Later Reprints - Old Man & the Devils

           1925 Reprint - Old Man & the Devils

No 8. Urashima, The Fisher-Boy (28 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - Urashima (Type A1 Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Fisher Boy Urashima

           c1917 Reprint - The Fisher Boy Urashima

No 9. The Serpent With Eight Heads (28 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - Yamata No Orochi (Type A1 Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1886, Plain Paper - The Serpent With Eight Heads (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Serpent With Eight Heads

           c1904 & c1920 Reprints The Serpent With Eight Heads

No 10. The Matsuyama Mirror (22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - Matsuyama Kagami (Type A1 Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1886, Plain Paper - The Matsuyama Mirror (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Matsuyama Mirror

           c1902 Reprint - The Matsuyama Mirror

           1937 Reprint - The Matsuyama Mirror (Y. Nishinomiya)

           1957 Reprint - The Matsuyama Mirror (Y. Nishinomiya)

No 11. The Hare of Inaba (18 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - The Hare of Inaba (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Hare of Inaba

           c1898 and Later Reprints - The Hare of Inaba

No 12. The Cub's Triumph (26 pp)

           1st Edition, 1886, Plain Paper - Kitsune no Tegara (Type A1 Cover)

           1st Edition, Later Printing, c1886, Plain Paper - Cub's Triumph (Type B Cover)

           c1898 Reprint - The Cub's Triumph

    (First editions (English) of No. 7 ~ No. 12 completed 1886)

No 13. The Silly Jelly-Fish (22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1887, Plain Paper - The Silly Jelly-Fish (Type B Cover)

           c1898 & c1910 Reprints - The Silly Jelly-Fish

No 14. The Princes Fire-Flash and Fire-Fade (28 pp)

           1st Edition, 1887, Plain Paper - Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade

           c1889 Reprint - Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade

           c1898 Reprint - Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade

           1917 Reprint - Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade

No 15. My Lord Bag-O'Rice (22 pp)

           1st Edition, 1887, Plain Paper My Lord Bag-O Rice (Type B Cover)

No 16. The Wooden Bowl (28 pp)

           1st Edition, 1887, Plain Paper - The Wooden Bowl (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - The Wooden Bowl

    (First editions (English) of No. 13 ~ No. 16 completed 1887)

No 16. The Wonderful Tea-Kettle (28 pp, 1896 substitution for above)

           c1922 Reprint - Wonderful Tea Kettle

No 17. Schippeitaro (26 pp, translated by T.H. James)

           1st Edition, 1888, Plain Paper - Schippetaro

           c1889 Reprint - Schippeitaro

           c1902 Reprint - Schippeitaro

No 18. The Ogre's Arm (34 pp, translated by T.H. James)

           1st Edition, 1889, Plain Paper - The Ogre's Arm (Type B Cover)

           c1889 Reprint - Ogre's Arm

           c1922 Reprints (Type A & B) - Ogre's Arm

    First editions (English) of No. 17 ~ No. 18 completed 1888~9)

No 19. The Ogres of Oyeyama (32 pp, translated by T.H. James)

           c1922 Reprint - Ogres of Oyeyama

No 20. The Enchanted Waterfall (22 pp, translated by T.H. James)

           1918 & c1922 Reprints - Enchanted Waterfall

    First editions (English) of No. 19 ~ No. 20 completed 1891~2.

Nos 1-20. Complete Set, Spanish Language (462 pp)

           Nos 1-20 1914

Nos 1-20. Complete Set (474 pp)

           Nos 1-20 c1922 Reprint Set

Nos 3//16. Printing for Griffith, Farran & Co.

           Nos 3-16 c1888 Partial Set

No 21. Three Reflections, Meiji 27 (1894), 13 x 17 cm (26 pp, translated by T.H. James).

No 22. The Flowers of Remembrance and Forgetfulness, ca 1896 (22 pp, translated by T.H. James).

          c1896 - Flowers of Remembrance and Forgetfulness

No 23. The Boy Who Drew Cats (24 pp, translated by L. Hearn, very large format in plain paper (7 1/2 x 9 1/4 in) & large format in crepe paper, both published 1898)

           1898 Crepe Paper - The Boy Who Drew Cats

           c1911 Reprint - The Boy Who Drew Cats

           c1922 Reprint - The Boy Who Drew Cats

           c1925 Reprint - The Boy Who Drew Cats (No Fairy Tale Number, Hearn Set)

No 24. The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling (24 pp), translated by L. Hearn, very large format in plain paper (7 3/16 x 9 1/2 in) published 1903

           c1902 - Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling

           1931 & 1937 Reprints - Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling 22 pp (No Fairy Tale Number, Hearn Set)

No 25. Chin Chin Kobakama (24 pp, translated by L. Hearn, very large format in plain paper (7 1/4 x 9 5/16 in) & large format in crepe paper, both published 1903, 15 editions published through 1925)

           1903 & c1911 Reprints - Chin Chin Kobakama

           1925 Reprint - Chin Chin Kobakama (No Fairy Tale Number, Hearn Set)

    First editions (English) of No. 21 ~ No. 25 completed 1894~1903.

 
Second Series

No 1. The Goblin Spider (22 pp, translated by L. Hearn), large format on plain paper (7 1/2 x 9 1/4 in) & small format on crepe paper (4 x 5 15/16 in), both published in 1899, and two more editions, 1899 (2nd) and 1926 (3rd). For information on the crepe version, click here. In the White Aster, this book is incorrectly listed as No. 23 in the first series.

          c1910 Reprint - The Goblin Spider

           1931 & 1942 Reprints - The Goblin Spider 18 pp (No Fairy Tale Number, Hearn Set)

No 2. The Wonderful Mallet, 1899, (30 pp, translated by T.H. James)

 
No 3. The Broken Images, 1903, (translated by T.H. James)

 
    First editions, (English) of Nos. 1 - 3, Second Series, completed 1899~1903.

 
Unnumbered

The Fountain of Youth - Japanese Fairy Tale, (28 pp, translated by L. Hearn), very large format on plain paper (7 1/16 x 9 9/16 in) and large format on crepe paper (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in) both published in 1922. Other crepe paper editions confirmed in 1925 and 1930. For information on the 1930 printing, click here.

 
Special Printings for Griffith, Farran & Company, London

Fairy Tales 1-16 were printed by Hasegawa specially for Griffith, Farran & Company, London. These carry that companies imprint at the bottom of the front cover. They also carry the Kobunsha, Tokyo, imprint internally. These books were produced in the period from 1887-1889 (2 Minami Segicho address) and you often see the year 1890 associated with them. You find these book individually and bound, generally in units of 4 books per bound volume. Information on 11 different books of this special printing is here.

 
Special Set Similar to the Griffith Farran & Company Set

Fairy Tales 1-18 on crepe paper and bound in the Western style were issued ca 1889. These books carry the 2 Minami Segicho and 3 Maruya-cho addresses. They are similar to the Griffith Farran & Company books but do not carry that imprint. Information on 13 different books of this printing is here.

 
Consolidated Sets, 1st Series, Bound in Volumes

Volume I.    No 1-6, 1886, plain paper, cardboard covers 
Volume II.   No 7-13, 1887, plain paper, cardboard covers 
Volume III.  No 13-18, 1889, plain paper, cardboard covers

These three volume consolidated sets are bound together with very sturdy Kangxi binding format (see below). They all are on plain paper and the top and bottom covers are much thicker than the paper used for the books inside. The front covers are nicely illustrated with color woodblocks. Volumes I & II carry the 2 Minami Saegicho address. Volume III carries the 3 Maruya-cho address. The three volumes in this set are discussed and recorded by Sharf (at pages 16 & 63). In these books the front covers of the individual fairy tales are not present. For more information on Volume III of this set, click here.

 
Sets of the First Japanese Fairy Tale Series

While the exact day is not clear, in a catalogue with the 17 Kami Negishi address (1911 or later), Hasegawa marketed the complete English language Japanese Fairy Tale Series (Nos. 1-20). These were described as 4 x 6 in on crepe paper and sold for $12.00 (delivered). I have examined one of these sets and all books except one carried the Kami Negishi address. No 17 carried the 38 Yotsuya Honmura address. While many of the books carried the dates of earlier printings, as is common on Hasegawa colophons, several also included Taisho 10 (1921) and Taisho 11 (1922) dates also. Based on these dates, I have established the approximate date for the set as ca 1922.

 
 

Large Format, Hearn, Consolidated Set, 1st & 2nd Series Books, Japanese Fairy Tales translated by Lafcadio Hearn, sold in one folding case, Tokyo, Hasegawa, 5 volume set, crepe paper, large size (large 12mo - 5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.6 x 19 cm). Titles are:

  1. The Boy Who Drew Cats (1st Series, #23)
  2. The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling (1st Series, #24)
  3. Chin Chin Kobakama (1st Series, #25)
  4. The Goblin Spider (2nd Series, #1)
  5. The Fountain of Youth

The series and numbers shown above were omitted from the books in these sets. These five books were marketed directly by Hasegawa as a set and sold in a blue wrap-around case. For information on the five volume set marketed directly by Hasegawa, click here. They were also sold individually. For information on a five books set with one book (Goblin Spider) dated in 1942, click here. In the table of books in Saeko Ishizawa's book (Chirimen-bon no Subete: Meiji Obun Sashie-bon) dates between 1898 and 1930 are indicated for these books (Cats - 1898, Old Woman - 1927, Chin Chin Kobakama - 1925, Goblin Spider - 1926 and Fountain of Youth - 1930; Ishizawa #29-33).

Hasegawa also produced a set for Macrae-Smith Company, Philadelphia, 1931. Based upon information I have available, the five books in the Macrae-Smith Company set do not carry the Macrae-Smith Company imprint nor are they dated 1931, in Japanese or English. It appears that the Macrae-Smith, Philadelphia, imprint is found only on the paste on title on the blue wrap-around case. I believe that the books in this set vary only slightly from other printings. It is possible they are indistinguishable (without the folding case) from the same books marketed, individually or in sets, directly by Hasegawa. None of the books in this type of set carried a series number. They all carry the 17 Kami Negishi address despite the fact that colophons indicate different address and earlier printing and publication dates. The books in this set were originally wrapped in thin rice type paper and a publisher's insert accompanied the set. The insert gives a price for the set of $7.50, delivered. The insert also advertises a 20 volume set of the Japanese Fairy Tales (6 x 4 in) for $12.00, delivered. The same insert prices the three volume Sword and Blossom Poems set for $8.50, delivered. The insert also states: "Hasegawa Publishing Company, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, Japan."

The above 5 books, all translated by Lafcadio Hearn, were initially issued in large plain paper (not creped) format (7+ x 9+ in) and simultaneously, or in some cases later, in smaller crepe paper versions (5 1/2+ x 7 1/2+ in - 191~193 x 135~138 mm).

The Fountain of Youth has an unusual history. It apparently was intended to be a part of the Second Series (1899-1903) but the manuscript was "misplaced" and it was not published until much later (1922). To compound the situation, the stock was destroyed in a fire caused by an earthquake. For more information on this book, click here.

The relationship between Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) and Takejiro Hasegawa is a fascinating one. Hearn was an accomplished and prolific writer living in Japan at the time. He clearly was interested in collaborating with Hasegawa and one might expect that he would have been involved in many of Hasegawa's publications. Frederic A. Sharf discusses the Hasegawa/Hearn relationship in depth the "Biographical Notes on Takejiro Hasegawa's Contributing Authors and Translators" to his book, Takejiro Hasegawa: Meiji Japan's Preeminent Publisher of Wood-Block-Illustrated Crepe-Paper Books. Hearn first contacted Hasegawa in 1894 suggesting a new fairy tale series. It is abundantly clear that Hasegawa did not share the same enthusiasm for Hearn's work and the new fairy tale series that Hearn envisioned. The "misplacing" of the Fountain of Youth manuscript by Hasegawa was entirely consistent with Hasegawa's attitude. Between 1898 and Hearn's death in 1904 only four of his works were used by Hasegawa (First Series, No. 23-5 and Second Series, No. 1). After his death, only one more Hearn work was published (Fountain of Youth 1922).

 
Large Format, Kate (Mrs. T.H.) James Set of Five. At about the same time that Hasegawa (Nishinomiya) sold the large format crepe paper Hearn set of five, the firm marketed a large format crepe paper version of five Japanese Fairy Tale books translated by Kate James. These books are in a large format for a Hasegawa book, large 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2+ in - 13.3~13.7 x 19~19.2 cm). The titles in this set are:

  1. Momotaro with additional title on front cover reading Japanese Fairy Tale
  2. The Tongue-Cut Sparrow
  3. Three Reflections with additional title on the front cover reading Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 21
  4. The Flowers of Remembrance and Forgetfulness
  5. The Wooden Bow with additional title on front cover reading Japanese Fairy Tale

To see the front covers of three of these books, click here.

 

Aino Fairy Tales (by B.H. Chamberlain) Series (Kobunsha)
(All on plain paper and large (small 12mo - 5+ x 7+ in) format)

No 1. The Hunter in Fairy-Land (1887)
No 2. The Birds' Party (1887)
No 3. The Man Who Lost His Wife (copyright 1887, released Oct 1889)

I have not seen a crepe paper version of these books reported.

 

Japanese Fairy Tales Translated into
Other than the English Language


Japanesiske Eventyr, Nos. 1-3
Danish Language

While the focus of Hasegawa's publishing effort was to present the Japanese Fairy Tales translated into English, he also published many of them in other languages. With the exception of the German, French and Spanish translations, most of these books are rarely seen. A list of the fairy tale books published by Hasegawa in other than the English language is found here. For some languages (Danish, Dutch, Swedish, Russian & Italian) only one to three books were translated and there probably was only one printing. The books were generally printed in crepe paper versions but the Danish and Dutch books are plain paper. It appears that the first of these non-English books published is a three volume set in Danish titled "Japanesiske Eventyr." This set is on plain paper. It includes the Battle of the Monkey and the Crab (I), Tongue Cut Sparrow (II) and The Old Man and the Devils (III). These books were first published in English on plain paper in the 1885~6 period and it appears the Danish translations were published in 1886~1888 period. For more information on the Danish set of three books, click here.

 
Western Fairy Tale Series
Yattsuyagi (Eight Goats), Hasegawa's first and only effort to translate a Western fairy tale (Grimm) into Japanese, text in Japanese, plain paper, 12.6 x 18.1 cm.

 


Other Hasegawa Publications


 
Hasegawa, T. (Publisher)
Bostwick, F.M. (Mae St. John):
Kohana San, T. Hasegawa, Tokio (10 Hiyoshicho), 1892 & c1893, large 12 mo. An illustrated story of Kohana-san (Little Flower), a Geisha of Kobe, presented in song and woodblock illustrations. Music and verse, written by F. M. Bostwick, US Navy (actually Mae St. John), and sung to the air of "Bally Holly." Front cover reads, "T. Hasegawa, Kelly & Walsh, Ltd, Yokohama, Tokyo, 1892." Eleven or 12 pages of folded creped paper for a total of 22 or 24 pages (front and back cover included in the count). The first part of the book is a musical score (sung to the tune of "Bally Holly"). The score is followed by additional sets of lyrics. This book was also issued in a plain paper version.

There were two printings of this book. There are minor differences in the printings. One version has 22 pages. The other version has 24 pages.

To see the complete 22 page version, 1892, click here.
To see the complete 24 page version, c1893, click here.

~~ Available - "Kohana San" (1892.4.10 - 24 Page Version, Type I Imprint) - Purchase Here ~~
~~ Available - "Kohana San" (1892.4.10 - 24 Page Version, Type II Imprint) Good+ - Purchase Here ~~
~~ Available - "Kohana San" (1892.4.10 - 24 Page Version, Type II Imprint) Good - Purchase Here ~~

 
Similar Books Printed by Hasegawa (Crepe Paper and Non-Crepe Paper):

  • c1884, Writings of Buddha, 2 volumes, copyrighted November 26, 1884, issued under the Kobunsha imprint.


    Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books - Begin

  • No. 1, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Momotaro, No. 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokio (No. 2 Miami Sayegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (Little Peachling) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, string or stab tied, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated in one color. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 1, ca 1886~1887, Second Edition, David Thompson (translator), Momotaro, No. 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, stated second edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (Little Peachling) is stated on the first page, transliterated title and "Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 1" inside the front cover, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by David Thompson. The colophon indicates a publication date of Meiji 19 (1886), Aug 26. A very similar later printing of the plain paper Second Edition was published ca 1887. For more information on these two printings of the Second Edition, click here.

  • No. 1, 1887, Japanese Market Edition, David Thompson (translator), Momotaro, No. 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, stated second edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (Little Peachling) is stated on the first page, transliterated title and "Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 1" inside the front cover, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by David Thompson. The colophon indicates a publication date of Meiji 19 (1886), Aug 26. A very similar later printing of the plain paper Second Edition was published ca 1887. For more information on these two printings of the Second Edition, click here.

  • No. 1, 1887, "School and Home Use" Edition, T.H. James (translator), Momotaro, No. 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 20 (1887), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, plain wraps and plain paper in 12 folded pages (covers not counted), string tied (Kangxi style), Japanese and English title pages, internal illustrations in color, full colophon at the back followed by a list of the Kobunsha's Japanese Fairy Tale Series (Nos. 1-12). The English title page reads: "The Japanese Fairy Tales for School and Home Use, No. 1, Momotaro, Arranged by Mrs. T.H. James."

  • No. 1, ca 1889, David Thompson (translator), Momotaro (Second Edition), No 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (3 Maruyacho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 1, c1911, David Thompson (translator), Momotaro, (Little Peachling also on title page), No. 1, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1911, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), Hasegawa, title on cover is transliterated but translated on the title page, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, string tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). This is a latter printing of this book which was first in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. While this is a c1911 reprint,* the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885) and a publication date the same year. The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. For more information on this book, click here.

  • [No. 1], 1932, Kate (Mrs. T.H.) James (translator), Momotaro or Little Peachling (Japanese Fairy Tale but no number stated), Showa 7 (1932), Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, crepe paper, large size for a Hasegawa book, 12 mo (5 1/2 x 7 5/8 in -13.8 x 19.3 cm), spine covered. The text and illustrations in this book differ from those in the books translated by David Thompson. The colophon states a printing and publication date of Showa 7 (1932). I have examined two minor varieties of this book. One states "T. Hasegawa" on the title page. The other states "T. Hasegawa Publishing Co." To see the front cover, colophon and title pages, click here (T. Hasegawa on cover and title page) and here (Hasegawa Publishing Co, one version with "Published by T. Hasegawa, Tokyo" on the front cover and one version without it). Kate (Mrs. T.H.) James initially translated Momotaro for Hasegawa in a book that was published in 1887. This book was titled "The Japanese Fairy Tales for School and Home Use, No. 1, Momotaro" (see 1887 above). Two other similar large format crepe paper books were produced about this same time. They were The Wooden Bowl (no number on cover) and Three Reflections, Japanese Fairy Tale 21. To see the front covers, click here.

  • No. 1, 1885~1932, Momotaro, a specialist collector of these books has recorded 13 different printings of this book. This demonstrates the complexity of any undertaking to catalogue and document the scope of T. Hasegawa's publishing work.

  • No. 2, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Shitakiri Suzume, No. 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokio (No. 2 Minami Sayegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, first printing, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Tongue Cut Sparrow) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, string tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated in one color. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Shitakiri Suzume" Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 2 (1885, 1st Edition, 1st Printing, Variety B) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 2, 1886, First Edition, Second Printing, David Thompson (translator), Shitakiri Suzume, No. 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1885), Tokio (No. 2 Minami Sayegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, second printing, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Tongue Cut Sparrow) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated in one color. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Shitakiri Suzume" Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 2, (1886, 1st Edition, 2nd Printing) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 2, 1886, Second Edition, David Thompson (translator), Tongue Cut Sparrow, No. 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Sayegicho), Kobunsha imprint, stated second edition, title on cover is English (translated) and the fairy tale number is stated, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by David Thompson. The colophon indicates an additional printing date of Meiji 19 (1886) in addition to the Meiji 18 dates found in the first printing. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 2, c1889, David Thompson (translator), Tongue Cut Sparrow, No 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 2, c1898, David Thompson (translator), Tongue Cut Sparrow, No. 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku), Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (3 3/4 x 6 in - 9 x 15 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in color. The back cover has a subdued color pattern. This is a latter printing of this book which was first published in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. While this is a c1898 reprint, the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, 1885 (Meiji 18). The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 2, c1911, David Thompson (translator), Tongue Cut Sparrow, No. 2, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1911, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, 22 (24) pages total including covers (11 or 12 folded pages). This is a latter printing of this book which was first published in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. While this is a c1911 reprint,* the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885). The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. The book is found with an additiona 2 pages of publisher's advertisements at the rear (Type b, 24 pages) and without the advertisements (Type a, 22 pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 3, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Saru-Kani Kassen (1st printing), or Battle of the Monkey & the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, first printing, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (Battle of the Monkey & the Crab) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab tied with silk threads, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 3, 1886, Second Edition, David Thompson (translator), Saru Kani Kassen, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3 (Second Edition), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, second edition, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 3, 1886, Second Edition, David Thompson (translator), Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3 (Second Edition), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, second edition, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3 (Second Edition)" (1886) VG+ - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3 (Second Edition)" (1886) VG - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3 (Second Edition)" (1886) VG- - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 3, 1888, Griffith, Farran & Co. Printing, David Thompson (translator), Battle of the Monkey & the Crab, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 3, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, title on cover is translated into English, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (3 3/4 x 6 in - 9.7 x 15.1 cm), crepe paper folded sheets, spine covered with silk type fabric, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in color. The back cover has a subdued color pattern. This is a latter printing of this book which was first published in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitahu was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 3, c1903, David Thompson (translator), Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, No. 3, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1903, Tokyo (38 Honmura-cho), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). This is a latter printing of this book which was first in 1885 on plain paper. While this is a c1911 reprint, the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885). The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 3, c1911 & c1930, David Thompson (translator), Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, No. 3, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1911, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa (ca 1911) / Y. Nishinomiya (ca 1930), small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). This is a latter printing of this book which was first in 1885 on plain paper. While these are c1911 and c1930 reprints, the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885). The book was reprinted several times over the years. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 4, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Hanasaki Jiji (1st printing), or Hanasaki Jiji, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 4 (2nd printing), Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Old Man who Made Dead Trees Blossom) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, string tied or cord stab ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Hanasaki Jiji" (1885, 1st Edition, 1st printing) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Hanasaki Jiji, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 4" (1885, 1st Edition, 2nd printing, Very Good) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Hanasaki Jiji, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 4" (1885, 1st Edition, 2nd printing, Good) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 4, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), The Old Man Who Made The Dead Trees Blossom, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 4 (1st edition, 2nd printing), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Old Man Who Made The Dead Trees Blossom" (1885, 1st Edition, 2nd printing, VG+) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Old Man Who Made The Dead Trees Blossom" (1885, 1st Edition, 2nd printing, VG) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 4, c1889, David Thompson (translator), The Old Man Who Made Dead Trees Blossom, No 4, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 4, c1911, David Thompson (translator), The Old Man Who Made the Dead Trees Blossom, No. 4, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1911, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab tied, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in color. The back cover has a subdued color pattern. Internally there are 14 pages with color woodblock illustrations. This is a later printing of this book which was first in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. While this is a c1911 reprint, the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885). The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 5, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Kachi-Kachi Yama, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 18 (1885), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (Kachi-Kichi Mountain) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The colophon indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885) and a publication date of March the next year. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Kachi-Kachi Yama" (1885, Type A1 Covers, 1st Edition, Stab Ties) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 5, c1888 Reprint, David Thompson (translator), Kachi-Kachi Mountain, Japanese Fairy Tale Series not stated on the cover, c1888, early (perhaps first) crepe paper version, 2 Minami Saegi-Cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, title on cover is translated into English, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 1/8 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The colophon indicates a printing date of August 17, Meiji 18 (1885) and a publication date of August 29 the next year. However it also lists other dates, the latest of which is August 1, Meiji 21 (1888). The 2 Minami Saegicho Kobunsha address is shown on the front cover, colophon inside the front cover and the colophon on the back cover. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Kachi-Kachi Mountain" (c1888, Reprint) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 5, c1889, Reprint, David Thompson (translator), Kachi-Kachi Mountain, front cover also contains "5" in manuscript, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 5, c1898 Reprint, David Thompson (translator), Kachi-Kachi Mountain, No 5, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, title on cover is translated into English, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. Internally there are 19 pages with color woodblock illustrations and text. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 5, 1955 Reprint, David Thompson (translator), Kachi-Kachi Mountain, No 5, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1955 (Showa 30) reprint, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, Y. Nishinomiya, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon which carries the date of Showa 30 (1955). To see the covers and colophon of this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Kachi Kachi Mountain" No 5. (1955, Reprint) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 6, 1885, First Edition, David Thompson (translator), Nedzumi no Yome-iri, Meiji 18 (1885), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Mouse's Wedding) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, string tied, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 6, c1886, David Thompson (translator), Nedzumi no Yome-iri, No. 6, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1886, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Mouse's Wedding) is stated on the first page, transliterated title and "Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 6" inside the front cover, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 22 pages total including covers (22 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 6, c1886, David Thompson (translator), The Mouse's Wedding, No. 6, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1886, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is translated into English, English title (The Mouse's Wedding) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab tied, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 6, 1888, David Thompson (translator), The Mouse's Wedding, No. 6, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 21 (1888), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, later printing, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 5/8  x 7 1/4 in - 11.6 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The colophon indicates a printing date of August 1, Meiji 21 (1888). I have only seen this version in bound volumes of the fairy tale series. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 6, c1911, David Thompson (translator), The Mouse's Wedding, No. 6, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1911, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, string tied, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in color. The back cover has a subdued color pattern. Internally there are 16 pages with color woodblock illustrations. This is a later printing of this book which was first in 1885 on plain paper. Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. While this is a c1911 reprint, the colophon in the book indicates a printing date of September 18, Meiji 18 (1885). The book was reprinted several times over the years. This copy is dated not by the colophon but by the Hasegawa address. I have examined two types of this book which I call type a and type b. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 7, 1886, James Curtis Hepburn (translator), The Old Man & The Devils, no Fairy Tale number on the front cover, "Japanese Fairy Tales, No. 7 in the colophon inside the front cover, Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 5/8  x 7 1/4 in - 11.6 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The colophon indicates a printing date of April 4, 1886 and a publication date in June. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 7, c1889, James Curtis Hepburn (translator), The Old Man & The Devils, No 7, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 7, c1898, James Curtis Hepburn (translator), The Old Man & The Devils, No. 7, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, later printing, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The front cover and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. Internally there are 14 pages with color woodblock illustrations and text. The first edition of this book was printed in April 1886 and published in June of 1886. This is a later edition (reprint) printed and published in August of 1897 (Meiji 30). For more information on this book and reprints through c1911, click here.

  • No. 7, 1921, James Curtis Hepburn (translator), The Old Man & The Devils, No. 7, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1921 (Taisho), 17 Kami Negishi, T. Hasegawa, later printing, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab tied, 22 pp - 11 folded pages- (including covers). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 8, 1886, First Edition, B.H. Chamberlain (translator), Urashima, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 8," Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Fisher Boy, Urashima) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab tied with silk treads, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The front cover is nicely illustrated in colors. The back cover is lightly illustrated with a wave pattern. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Urashima, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 8" (1886, 1st Edition) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Urashima, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 8" (1886, 1st Edition) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Urashima, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 8" (1886, 1st Edition) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 8, c1889, B.H. Chamberlain (translator), The Fisher Boy Urashima, No 8, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 9, 1886, First Edition, Basil Chamberlain Hall (translator), Yamata No Orochi, No. 9, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), 2 Minami Saegicho, Tokyo, Kobunsha/Hasegawa, medium size for a Hasegawa book,12mo (4 5/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), title is transliterated and includes the Japan Fairy Tale number (Type A1), plain paper in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The front and back covers are nicely illustrated in color. Sensei Eitahu was the artist who created the illustrations. The colophon in the book indicates a printing date of Meiji 19 (1886). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Yamata No Orochi" (1886, First Edition) Very Good - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 9, 1886, First Edition, Later Printing, Basil Chamberlain Hall (translator), Serpent With Eight Heads, No. 9, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1886, 2 Minami Saegicho, Tokyo, Kobunsha/Hasegawa, medium size for a Hasegawa book,12mo (4 5/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), title is translated and includes the Japan Fairy Tale number (Type B), plain paper in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Serpent With Eight Heads" (1886, First Edition, Later Printing), Very Good+ - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 9, c1889, B.H. Chamberlain (translator), The Serpent With Eight Heads, No 9, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 9, c1904, Basil Chamberlain Hall (translator), The Serpent With Eight Heads, No. 9, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1904, Tokyo (38 Honmura-cho), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, string tied, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The 38 Honmura, address provides the approximate date of the book. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 9, c1920, Basil Chamberlain Hall (translator), The Serpent With Eight Heads, No. 9, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1920, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The Kami Negishi, address provides the approximate date of the book. For more information on this book, click here.

  • Nos. 1-9, c1890, plain paper editions consolided into bound volume by Shepherds, London. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 10, 1886, First Edition, T.H. James (translator), Matsuyama Kagami, No. 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Matsuyama Mirror) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 10, 1886, First Edition, Later Printing, T.H. James (translator), Matsuyama Mirror, No. 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1886, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is in translated into English and the Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. is stated, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.3 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Matsuyama Mirror" (1886, First Edition, Later Printing) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 10, c1889, T.H. James (translator), The Matsuyama Mirror, No 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 10, c1898, T.H. James (translator), The Matsuyama Mirror, No 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon with dates from the 1st printing. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 10, c1902, T.H. James (translator), The Matsuyama Mirror, No 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1902 reprint, 38 Yotsuya Honmura, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon with dates from the 1st printing. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 10, 1937, T.H. James (translator), The Matsuyama Mirror, No 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1937 (Showa 12) reprint, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, Y. Nishinomiya, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon which carries the date of Showa 12. To see the covers and colophon of this book, click here.

  • No. 10, 1957, T.H. James (translator), The Matsuyama Mirror, No 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1957 (Showa 32) reprint, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, Y. Nishinomiya, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon which carries the date of Showa 32. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Matsuyama Mirror" (1957 Reprint) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 11, 1886, First Edition, T.H. James (translator), The Hare of Inaba, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 11 (1st edition, 2nd printing), Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, first edition, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 18mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). Sensei Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 11, c1889, T.H. James (translator), The Hare of Inaba, No 11, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 11, c1898 & Later, T.H. James (translator), The Hare of Inaba, No 11, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 & later reprints, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, 38 Honmura-cho & 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, 18 pp - 9 folded (including covers). The book contain a Japanese colophon with dates from the 1st printing. For more information on these books, click here.

  • No. 12, 1886, First Edition, T.H. James (translator), Kitsune no Tegara, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 12," Meiji 19 (1886), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is in phonetic Japanese (transliterated) rather than translated into English, English title (The Cubs Triumph) is stated on the first page, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.3 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 12, 1886, First Edition, Later Printing, T.H. James (translator), The Cub's Triumph, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 12," c1886, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is translated into English, English title, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.3 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 12, c1898, T.H. James (translator), The Cub's Triumph, No 12, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). The front cover and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. Internally there are 23 pages with color woodblock illustrations and text. The book contains a Japanese text colophon with dates from the 1st printing. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 13, 1887, First Edition, B.H. Chamberlain (translator), The Silly Jelly-Fish, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 13, Told in English by B.H. Chamberlain, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 13," Meiji 20 (1887), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.4 x 18.3 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Silly Jelly-Fish, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 13" (1887, 1st Edition), Very Good - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Silly Jelly-Fish, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 13" (1887, 1st Edition), Good - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 13, c1898 & C1910, Basil Hall Chamberlain (translator), The Silly Jelly Fish, No 13, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint and c1910 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku & & 38 Honmura-cho, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The book contains a Japanese text colophon with dates from the 1st printing. Inside the front cover is a advertisement/listing of books in the Japanese Fairy Tale Series. For more information on these books (c1898 and c1910 reprints), click here.

  • No. 14, 1887, First Edition, T.H. James (translator), The Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. 14," Meiji 20 (1887), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha imprint, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 16mo (4 3/4 x 7 1/4 in - 12.3 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab tied with silk treads, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The front and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. This book is found with with very different illustrations. I call these books Type 1 and Type 2. For more information on this book and the two types, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, No. 14" (1887, 1st Edition, Type 2), Very Good+ - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 14, c1889, T.H. James (translator), The Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, No 14, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha, ca 1889, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 14, c1898, T.H. James (translator), The Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, Told to Children by Mrs. T. H. James, No 14, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1898 reprint, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The front cover and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. Internally there are 25 pages with color woodblock illustrations and text. While this is a c1898 reprint, the book contains a Japanese text colophon with dates from the 1st printing. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 14, 1917, T.H. James (translator), The Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, Told in English by Kate James, No 14, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1917 reprint, 17 Kami Negishi-cho, Shitaya-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.1 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 28 pp - 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The front cover and back covers are nicely illustrated in colors. Internally there are 25 pages with color woodblock illustrations and text. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Princes Fire-Flash & Fire-Fade, No 14" (1917, Reprint) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 15, 1887, First Edition, Basil Hall Chamberlain (translator), My Lord Bag-o-Rice, No 15, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Meiji 20 (1887), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegi-cho, Kyobashi-ku), Kobunsha, first edition, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.2 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). Suzuki Kason was the artist who created the color woodcut illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 16, 1887, First Edition, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Wooden Bowl, No 16, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Meiji 20 (1887), Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Kobunsha,first edition, title on cover is translated into English, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/8 in - 12.4 x 18.3 cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). Tosa Matabei was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by Mrs. T.H. James. The colophon states a printing date of November 22, Meiji 20 (1887). Inside the back cover is a listing of the "Kobunsha Aino Fairy Tale Series" which lists all three books in that series. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 16, c1889, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Wooden Bowl, No 16, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (No. 2 Minami Saegicho), Meiji 20 (1887), but believed to have been published ca 1889, Kobunsha, title on cover is translated into English, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • [No. 16] 1934, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Wooden Bowl, Japanese Fairy Tale but without the number, crepe paper, large size for a Hasegawa book (19 x 13.5 cm), 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The colophon states a printing and publication date of Showa 9 (1934). To see the front cover, click here.

  • No. 16 (Replacement), c1917, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Wonderful Tea Kettle, No. 16, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1917 reprint, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 28 pages total including covers (14 folded pages). The first printing of this book was in 1896. It was a replacement/substitution for The Wooden Bowl. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Wonderful Tea Kettle" - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 17, 1888, First Edition, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Schippeitaro, No 17, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo, Meiji 21 (1888), Kobunsha, first edition, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/8 in - 12.6 x 18. cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). Suzuki Kason was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by Mrs. T.H. James. For more information on this book, click .

  • No. 17, 1889, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Schippeitaro, No 17, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo, 1889, Kobunsha, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 17, c1902, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Schippeitaro, No. 17, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1902 reprint, Tokyo (38 Hommura), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.5 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). Suzuki Kason was the artist who created the color woodcut illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 18, 1889, First Edition, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Ogre's Arm, No 18, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo, Meiji 22 (1889), Kobunsha, first edition, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 x 7 1/8 in - 12.6 x 18. cm), plain paper (not crepe) in folded sheets, spine not covered, 2 single sheets, 16 folded pages (including covers), 34 pages total. Kobayashi Eitaku was the artist who created the illustrations. Translated from Japanese to English by Mrs. T.H. James. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 18, 1889, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Ogre's Arm, No 18, Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Tokyo (3 Maruyacho), Meiji 22 (1889), Kobunsha, very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 32mo (3 1/2 x 5 7/8 in - 9.5 x 15 cm), creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, bound Western style with no stab or external string ties, 28 pp - 13 folded (including covers) plus two single pages. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 18, c1922, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Ogre's Arm, No. 18, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1922 reprint, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 26 pages total including covers (13 folded pages). The first printing of this book was in 1891. For more information on this book, click here.

  • Nos. 1-18, 1886~89, consolidated set in 3 volumes, Japanese Fairy Tales, Volumes I~III, Volume I. No 1-6, 1886, Volume II. No 7-13, 1887 and Volume III. No 13-18, 1889. The books in the three volume consolidated sets are 12mo (5 x 7 1/8 in - 12.6 x 18 cm) and bound in the Kangxi binding format. They all are on plain paper and the front and back covers are much thicker than the paper used for the books inside. The front covers are nicely illustrated with color woodblocks. Volumes I & II carry the 2 Minami Saegicho address. Volume III carries the 3 Maruya-cho address. For more information on Volume III (1889) click here.

  • Extra No., 1889, E. Rothesay Miller (translator), Princess Splendor, The Wood-cutter's Daughter, an unnumbered book in Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1889 (Meiji 22), 1st edition in plain paper (3 Maruyacho, Tokyo, address) and crepe paper (10 Hiyoshicho, Tokyo, address), 2nd edition, 1895, in crepe paper only (10 Hiyoshicho, Tokyo, address), 18mo, 49 folded pages - including covers, 98 pp. The 2nd edition of the crepe paper edition is a larger size than the 1st edition of the crepe paper book. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 19, c1922, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Ogres of Oyeyama, No. 19, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1922 reprint, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 32 pages total including covers (16 folded pages). The first printing of this book was in 1891. For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 20, 1918 and c1922, Types A & B, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), The Enchanted Waterfall, No. 20, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1922 reprint, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • Nos. 1-20, 1914, Spanish Edition, Cuentos Del Japon Viejo, Nos. 1~10 and Leyendas y Narraciones Japonesas, Nos. 1~10, set of 20 books, Japanese Fairy Tales (Spanish), Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), Taisho 3 (1914), small 18mo (4 1/8 x 6 in - 10.1~10.4 x 15~15.2 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered with silk type fabric, silk stab ties, each book with 18~28 (9-14 folded) pages total including covers, a total of 462 pages (231 folded pages). For more information, on this book set, click here.

  • Nos 1-20, 1906, in an advertisement published in 1906, Hasegawa offered the 20 volume set "..in a neat cardboard box" for $6.00 and "in a damask [fabric covered] box" for $6.50.

  • Nos. 1-20, c1910, Mrs. T.H. James (translator) etc, Nos. 1-20, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1910 reprint, Tokyo (38 Honmura-cho, Yotsuya-ku), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab tied with silk threads, each number with 18~32 pages total including covers. For more information on this book set, click here.

  • Nos. 1-20, c1922, Mrs. T.H. James (translator) etc, Nos. 1-20, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1922 reprint, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.2 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties with silk threads, each number with 18~32 pages total including covers, a total of 237 folded pages or 474 pages. For more information on this book set, click here.

  • No. 21, 1934, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Three Reflections, Japanese Fairy Tale No, 21, crepe paper, large size for a Hasegawa book (19 x 13.5 cm), 24 folded pages, including the covers. The colophon states a printing and publication date of Showa 11 (1936). To see the front cover, click here.

  • No. 22, c1896, Mrs. T.H. James (translator), Flowers of Remembrance and Forgetfulness, Japanese Fairy Tale No, 22, crepe paper, large size for a Hasegawa book (19.2 x 13.8 cm), silk stab ties, 11 folded pages, a total of 22 pages including the covers. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Flowers of Remembrance and Forgetfulness" c1896 - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 23, 1898, c1911 & c1922, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Boy Who Drew Cats, No. 23, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), Meiji 31 (1898), small 12mo (5 x 6 3/4 in - 12.8 x 17.3 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk tied, 24 pages (12 folded pages) including the covers. The artist who created the illustrations was Suzuki Kason. This was the first book published by Hasegawa with Hearn's work. Four others would follow. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Boy Who Drew Cats" (c1922) As New - Purchase Here ~~

  • No Number, c1925, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Boy Who Drew Cats, Japanese Fairy Tale, T. Hasegawa, "Publisher and Art Printer," (17 Kami Negishi), c1925, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale" (no number however), medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.3 cm), silk stab ties, spine covered, creped paper in folded sheets, 12 folded pages (including covers), 24 pages total. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available -"The Boy Who Drew Cats" (c1925) Fine - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Boy Who Drew Cats" (c1925) VG - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 24, c1902, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling, No. 24, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), c1902, 38 Honmura-cho, Yotsuya-ku, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa - Publisher and Art Printer, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/4 x 7 1/4 in - 13.5 x 19 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk tied, 2 pages of publisher's books at the rear, 24 pages total including covers (12 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No Number, 1931, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling, Japanese Fairy Tale, T. Hasegawa, "Publisher and Art Printer," (17 Kami Negishi), c1925, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale" (no number however), medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.3 cm), silk stab ties, spine cover, creped paper in folded sheets, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No. 25, 1903, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), Chin Chin Kobakama, No. 25, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English), 1903 (Meiji 36), 38 Honmura-cho, Yotsuya-ku, Tokyo, Hasegawa, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.6 x 19 cm), folded crepe paper, spine covered, string tied, 24 pages total including covers (12 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

  • No Number, 1925, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), Chin Chin Kobakama, Japanese Fairy Tale, T. Hasegawa (17 Kami Negishi), 1925, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale" (no number however), medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.3 cm), silk stab ties, spine covered, creped paper in folded sheets, 24 pages total including covers (12 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Chin Chin Kobakama" Type A1, 1925 - Fine - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Chin Chin Kobakama" Type A2, 1925 - Fine - Purchase Here ~~

  • Unnumbered, 1922, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Fountain of Youth - Japanese Fairy Tale, large 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 14 x 19.5 cm), 9 folded pages (including front and back cover), crepe paper, stab ties, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). Most of the 1922 printing was destroyed in an earthquake and it is believed that only 200 copies were actually distributed. Other printings include 1925, 1926 (Martin Hopkinson Ltd, London - 200 copies), 1930 and 1931 (Macrae-Smith Company, Philadelphia - part of a set of five). For more information on this book, and the 1925 printing in specific, click here. For information on the 1930 printing, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Fountain of Youth" - Very Good (1925 Printing, Type A) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Fountain of Youth" - Fine (1925 Printing, Type B) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Fountain of Youth" - Very Good+ (1925 Printing, Type B) - Purchase Here ~~

  • No. 1, 2nd Series, c1910, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Goblin Spider, Japanese Fairy Tales, Second Series, No. 1, Tokyo (38 Honmura-cho), T. Hasegawa, ca 1910, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.4 x 15.2 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). This is a later printing. The colophon shows a date of 1899 (Meiji 32) but the 38 Honmura-cho address establishes it as a later printing.. In 1899 the Hasegawa address was 10 Hiyoshi-cho. To see this book, click here.

  • No Number, 1931, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), The Goblin Spider, Japanese Fairy Tale, T. Hasegawa (17 Kami Negishi), 1931, front cover also contains "Japanese Fairy Tale" (no number however), medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.3 cm), silk stab ties, spine covered, creped paper in folded sheets, 18 pages total including covers (9 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Goblin Spider" - Purchase Here ~~

  • No Numbers, c1931~1942, Lafcadio Hearn (translator), 5 book set The Boy Who Drew Cats (c1925), The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling (1931), Chin Chin Kobakama (1925), The Goblin Spider (1931 & 1942) and The Fountain of Youth (1930), Japanese Fairy Tales, Rendered into English by Lafcaido Hearn, T. Hasegawa, c1925~1931, no Fairy Tale numbers, medium size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.3 cm), stab ties, spine cover, creped paper in folded sheets. This set was marketed directly by T. Hasegawa. For more information on this book set, click here.
    ~~ Available - Five Book Set (ca 1931) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - Five Book Set (1942) - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - Four (of 5) Book Set - Purchase Here ~~

  • No Numbers, c1931, Lafcadio Hearn, 5 book set as above but marketed by Macrae-Smith Company, Philadelphia, folding case has Macrae-Smith Co. label.

     


    English Language Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books - End

     


    Aino Fairy Tale Series Books

  • 1887~9, Basil Hall Chamberlain, Aino Fairy Tales Series:

    No. 1. The Hunter in Fairy-Land (1887)
    No. 2. The Birds' Party (1887) and
    No. 3. The Man Who Lost His Wife (copyright 1887, published 1889).

    All printed on plain paper. Medium size, small 12mo (ca 5+ x 7+ in), for a Hasegawa book. No reports of any book from the series in crepe paper format. I have only seen No. 1 and No. 2 with the Tichnor & Co., Boston, additional imprint.

     


    Danish Japanese Fairy Tale Series
    Japanesiske Eventyr I, II & III

    Berner, Agnes (Translator)
    Hasegawa, T. (Publisher):
    Japanesiske Eventyr I, II & III, Paa Dansk v. Agnes Berner, Tokyo, The Kobunsha / T. Hasegawa and Copenhaven (Kjobenhaven), Ernest Bojesens, undated by ca 1888, small 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.2 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa publication, tan mulberry paper, folded pages, four stab hole Yamato toji binding with silk cord like ties, spine not covered, text in Danish, 9-11 folded pages (18-22 pages in total) including the covers. The books carry the Kobunsha, Tokyo imprint and the Ernest Bojesens, Kunst-Forlag imprint on the inside of the front cover.

    • Eventyr I. Krigen Mellem Aberne Og Krabberne, (Battle of the Monkey & the Crab), 9 folded pages (18 pages total).
    • Eventyr II. Spurven der mistede sin Tunge, (Tongue Cut Sparrow), 11 folded pages (22 pages total).
    • Eventyr III. Braendehuggeren Troldene, (Old Man and the Devils), 11 folded pages (22 pages total).

    For information on this set, click here.

     


    Dutch Language Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books & Calendar

  • 1892, De Musch Met De Geknipte Tong (The Tongue Cut Sparrow), Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), T. Hasegawa, Utrecht, 1892, Gedrukt voor H. Honig, medium size for a T. Hasegawa book, large 16mo (4 3/4 x 7+ in - 12.4 x 18 cm), text in Dutch language, plain paper in folded sheets, spine not covered, silk ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). For more information on this book, click here.

    Also:

    • 1886, Shitakiri Suzume, to see cover and colophon, click here.
    • Almanak voor 1903 Calendar for 1903.

     


    Japanesika Sagor
    Swedish Language Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books

  • c1896, Japanesika Sagor, three books, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), T. Hasegawa & Helsinki (Helsingfores), Wentzel Hagelstams Forlag, not dated but ca 1896, small size for a T. Hasegawa book, large 18mo (4 1/4 x 6 in - 10.5 x 15.1 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk ties.

    Also:

    • Momotaro, 10 folded pages, click here.
    • Sparfven med den Klippta Tungan, 11 folded pages, click here.
    • Gubben Och Trollen - Japanesiska Sagor, click here (outside web page).

     


    Japanische Marchen
    German Language Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books

  • No. 10, 1889, translated into German by Hedwig Schipplock Der Spiegel zu Matsuyama, Japanische Marchen, ["The Matsuyama Mirror" - No. 10, Japanese Fairy Tale Series (English)], Meiji 22 (1889), 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, text in German, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 1/8 x 6 1/8 in - 10.3 x 15.4 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pages total including covers (11 folded pages). The colophon gives the date of Meiji 22 (1889) and the 10 Hiyoshi-cho address. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Der Spiegel zu Matsuyama" - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1929-1931, Japanische Marchen, set of twelve books, Showa 4 (1929) & Showa 6 (1931), 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa/Y. Nishinomiya, text in German, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10 x 15 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties). This set contains the following English language Fairy Tale books translated into German: First Series, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 & 13 - Second Series, Nos 2 & 3 (12 books in total). For more information on these books, as well as early translations into German, click here.

     


    French Language Japanese Fairy Tale Series Books

  • c1903, Le Mariage de la Souris, No 6, Les Contes Du Vieux Japon (French), c1903, 38 Honmura-cho, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pp - 11 folded (including covers). The colophon carries the date of Meiji 29 (1896), however it is dated later by the 38 Honmura-cho address shown in the colophon. To see the covers and colophon, click here.

  • c1903, J. Dautremer (translator), Le Viellard et les Demons, No 7, Les Contes Du Vieux Japon (French), c1903, 38 Honmura-cho, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18m2o (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 24 pp - 12 folded (including covers). The colophon carries the date of Meiji 30 (1897), however it is dated later by the 38 Honmura-cho address shown in the colophon. To see the covers and colophon, click here.

  • 1897, J. Dautremer (translator), Le Miroir de Matsouyama, No 10, Les Contes Du Vieux Japon (French), Meiji 30 (1897), 10 Hiyoshicho, Tokio, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18m (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pp - 11 folded (including covers). The colophon carries the date of Meiji 30 (1897) which is consistent with the 10 Hiyoshichio address on the front cover. To see the covers and colophon, click here.

  • c1903,J. Dautremer (translator), Le Miroir de Matsouyama, No 10, Les Contes Du Vieux Japon (French), c1903, 38 Honmura-cho, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18m (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, stab ties, 22 pp - 11 folded (including covers). The colophon carries the date of Meiji 30 (1897), however it is dated later by the 38 Honmura-cho address shown in the colophon and inside the front cover. To see the covers and colophon, click here.

  • 1903, J. Dautremer (translator), La Victoire du Petit Renard, No 12, Les Contes Du Vieux Japon (French), 1903 (Meiji 36), 38 Honmura-cho, Tokyo, Hasegawa, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15.3 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, string tied, 26 pp - 13 folded (including covers). To see the covers and colophon, click here.

     


    Chronological Bibliography of T. Hasegawa Books
    Primarily Non-Japanese Fairy Tale Books

     

  • 1886, Fairy Tale Series - Series 1~6, six series combined in on book, printed for Maruzen company by Hasegawa, plain paper, illustrated cardboard covers. Hasegawa established a special working relationship with the Maruzen company which marketed his material in Japan, primarily to Western customers.

  • c1886, An English and Japanese Dictionary of the Convenient Size for School Use, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo.

  • 1887, Yattsuyagi, Western Fairy Tale Series, Hasegawa's first and apparently only effort to illustrate a Western fairy tale (Grimms' Fairy Tales - The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids). Translated into Japanese by Kure Ayautoshi, text entirely in Japanese, Meiji 20 (1887), printed July and published in September, plain paper, 12.6 x 18.1 cm. One of the few T. Hasegawa books with a movable parts. More information here (outside web site). There are two pages with flaps. The first, in the closed position shows the wolf at the door. When the flap is raised, it shows the kids inside the house. On the second flap, the fold-down flap in position, the image shows the sleeping wolf with his gorged stomach (he just eat the six little kids) and the mother goat (and one kid) standing over him with scissors. When the flap is folded down, the wolf's stomach has been cut open and the six little kids are emerging safe and sound.

  • 1887, Fairy Tale Series - Series 7~12, six series combined in on book, printed for Maruzen company by Hasegawa, plain paper, illustrated cardboard covers.

  • c1887, Charles J. Barnes, New National First Reader, Tokio, Kobunsha, red printed paper covered boards, 1 leaf in Japanese and 95 pp. Illustrated throughout with woodblocks of children at play, domestic animals, scenes of natural history, etc. A series of textbooks. Barnes had a series of five of them, of which this is the first, or most elementary. Not to be confused with the numerous American editions of school books under the same title published by Barnes in the US during this same period. I understand that there is a series of four books along this same line (school type books) by H. Saito titled Practical English Grammar - The Kobunsha Language Series. These bear the Kobunsha imprint and the date 1899. Later books (1920) by Kobunsha are found in the "The Kobunsha Series for Higher Schools."

  • 1889, Fairy Tale Series - Series 13~18, six series combined in on book, printed for Maruzen company by Kobunsha, plain paper, illustrated cardboard covers.

  • 1890, F.M. Bostwick, Oyuchasan, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho), Kobunsha, distributed by Kelly & Walsh, Yokohama, 12mo (4 7/8 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18.4 cm), Meiji 23 (1890), silk stab ties, 11 pages of folded plain (hosho) paper, 11 folded pages (including the covers), 22 pages. Music written by "Lieutenant F. M. Bostwick, US Navy" and sung to the a popular American song, "Rosalie." The book carries the Kelly & Walsh (Yokohama - No. 61) imprint in addition to Kobunsha. This book is sometimes found with Messrs. Essex & Cammeyer, United Kingdom imprint on the front cover rather than Kelly & Walsh. The colophon indicates a printing and publication date of mid-December, 1890 and the 10 Hiyoshi-cho address. This is during the time that the name was being shifted from Kobunsha to T. Hasegawa and at the same time Hasegawa moved his operation to that new address. This is the only first edition book (ie not a later reprint that just copied that imprint) that I aware of with the Kobunsha imprint and the Hiyoshi-cho address. According to Sharf, this was the last book to carry the Kobunsha name. A second edition of the book was published in 1892 in plain and crepe paper versions. A second edition of the book on crepe paper with the Kelly & Walsh imprint was published in 1893. While these second editions carried the same title as the first edition, they contained completely different illustrations. Kohanasan printed in 1892 was a companion to these books.
    For more information on the 1st edition (plain paper), click here.
    For information on the 2nd edition, 1892, (crepe paper), click here.
    For information on the 2nd edition, 1893, (crepe paper), click here.

  • c1890 - The Kobunsha imprint was discontinued and the "T. Hasegawa" imprint adopted, Oyuchasan appears to be the last book published unter the Kobunsha imprint.

  • 1890, Occupations of Twelve Months, T. Hasegawa, 12mo, 12 pp. Plates show women's occupations.

  • 1891, Mae St. John Bramhall, Japanese Jingles: Being a Few Little Verses Which Have Appeared Before in the "Japan Gazette", Hasegawa, Tokyo, distributed by Kelly & Walsh, Ltd, Yokohama, Meiji 24 (1891), crepe paper, small 12mo, 66 pp. A second edition (so stated on the title page) was published in 1892. A similar book Niponese Rhymes and Japanese Jingles was published later (1892 and some bear the imprint Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd, London). For more information on the first edition, click here and here for the second edition.
    ~~ Available - "Japanese Jingles" - 1891, 1st Ed, Very Good+ - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Japanese Jingles" - 1891, 1st Ed, Very Good - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Japanese Jingles" - 1892, 2nt Ed, Type II Imprint, VG - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1891, translated by Archibald Little, The Rat's Plaint, Translated from the Original Chinese by Archibald Little, F.R.G.S., published by T. Hasegawa, sold by Kelly & Walsh, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Yokohama & Singapore, crepe paper, 17 folded pages for a total of 34 pages. A second edition was published c1894 and states "Second Edition" on the front cover. The Littles, Archibald Little and Alica Bewicke Little, wrote extensively on China and the Far East. For more information on the first and second editions of this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Rat's Plaint, First Edition" - 1891 - Fair - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Rat's Plaint, Second Edition" (Type A1) - c1894 - Good+ - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Rat's Plaint, Second Edition" (Type A2b) - c1894 - Very Good+ - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Rat's Plaint, Second Edition" (Type A2b) - c1894 - Very Good - Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "The Rat's Plaint, Second Edition" - c1904 Printing - Fair - Purchase Here ~~

  • c1891, translated by Mrs. Archibald (Alicia Bewicke) J. Little, The Fairy Foxes, A Chinese Legend, Told in English by Mrs. Archibald Little, Chinese fairy tales, Tokyo (10 Hiyosicho), T. Hasegawa,crepe paper. Plain paper version also reported. A second edition was published in c1891 and a third edition in 1895 per the title page but November 1894 per the colophon. The third edition carries the Kelly & Walsh imprint. For information on the 3rd edition, click here (Internet Archive) or here. The second and third editions explicitly state the edition number on the cover and the title page.

  • 1892, F.M. Bostwick, Kohanasan, see above. Issued in 1890 and 1891, Oyuchasan (see above) was a companion book to this book.

  • 1892, W. H. Smith, Children's Japan, Tokyo (10 Hiyosicho), T. Hasegawa, Meiji 25 (1892), large 12 mo (6 1/2 x 7 3/4 in - 16.4 x 19.6 cm), silk stab ties, spine covered, crepe paper, 20 numbered pages,. Front cover reads, "T. Hasegawa, Hiyosicho, Tokio." Twelve pages of folded crepe paper for a total of 24 pages (front and back cover included in the count). A second edition has been confirmed. For more information on the 1892 (first edition) and 1895 (second edition) books, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Childrens Japan" - 1892, 1st Ed - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1892, Archibald Little, The Dragons at the Gate and Other Stories for Children, "ARSO," plain paper only, 69 pp.

  • 1892, With Compliments of the Season, T. Hasegaawa, Kelly & Walsh, 14 cm, 8 pp.

  • 1893, Japan Old and New: Exhibition of Figures Representing Life in Old and New Japan, plain paper, commissiond by the Japanese Government for sale at the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 25 pp.

  • 1893, Charles & Susan Bowles, The Only Coodles, London, Simpkin, Marshall Hamilton, Kent & Co. - Yokohama, Kelly & Walsh - Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, (Hiyoshicho address), printed 12/12/93 Published 12/18/93, large format, 18.5 x 15.7 cm, 48pp. A book about the Bowles' favorite dog in Vermont. Quite a challenge for the Japanese artist to produce the illustrations. Reissued in 1895 under a slightly different name.

  • 1893, Greetings from Far Cathay, 10 x 15 cm, 5 pp.

  • 1894, Pitch & Toss, or, The Kurile Intelligencer with the additional wording on the cover - On the Northern Pacific Ocean January 20, 1894, Dedicated to Commander Marshall & the Officers of the Royal Mail Steamship "Empress of India" by the Editor & Staff of the "Pitch and Toss", T. Hasegawa 10 Hiyoshicho, Tokyo, colophon reads June 6, Meiji 27 (1894), 7 1/2 x 6 in, 36 pp with a few photos bound in. Very limited printing. Rare.

  • 1894, Karl Florenz Dichtergrusse aus dem Osten, Japanische Dichtungen von K. Florenz, illustrated and printed by T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho and later addresses), distributed by C.F. Amelang's Verlag, Leipzig,, 1894 (Meiji 27)~ 1914 (Taisho 3), large 12 mo, large format for a Hasegawa book, (5 3/4 x 7 5/8 in - 14.6 x 19.4 cm), crepe paper, silk stab ties, 98 numbered pages, 51 folded pages - including the covers. Also published in English as Poetical Greetings from the Far East (see 1896, below). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Dichtergrusse aus dem Osten" - 1912, 14th Thousand - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1894, Mary G. Kimura, A Day with Mitsu, 12mo (6 1/2 x 7 1/2~3/4 in - 16.5 x 18.8~19.5 cm), 10 folded pages, crepe paper, stab ties, 16 numbered pages, 20 pages including the covers. Two types of front cover have been recorded. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1894, Rudolph Dittrich, Nippon Gakufu (Six Japanese Popular Songs collected and arranged for the Pianoforte by Rudolph Dittrich), Leipzig, Brussel, London & New York, Breitkopf und Hartel, Yokohama, J.G. Doering, "Sole Agent for Japan, China & Hong Kong," printed by T. Hasegawa, songs translated from Japenese into German and English. To see the front cover, click here. A "Second Series" was published in 1895 but I do not believe that it was printed by T. Hasegawa.

  • 1895, Japanese Pictures of Japanese Life, T. Hasegawa, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, first edition, 9 folded crepe paper pages, 18 pp. A reprint was published c1905 (see below). A book with the same title but different woodblock plates was published 1904 (see below also), For more information on this 1895, 1st edition, click here.

  • 1895, Karl Florenz, Japanische Dichtungen. Weissaster. Ein Romantisches Epos, Nebst Anderen Gedichten, Frei Nachgebildet von Karl Florenz, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho) and C.F. Amelang's Verlag, Leipzig, First Edition, 1895 (Meiji 28), folded crepe paper pages, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 3/4 (thick) in - 15.3 x 19 x 1 (thick) cm), German language, 2 page title page, 2 page dedication, 4 page forward, 80 numbered pages of text and 4 pages of notes. Some first editons are found with an insert correction folded sheet between pages 60~61. Composed of 47 folded pages (including 2 for the front and back covers). German language version of the White Aster. Later editions were pubished in 1897, 1905, 1907 & 1910. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Weissaster" - 1895 Edition - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1895, Charles & Susan Bowles, King Coodles the Faithful, the 1893 book with a few new illustrations, large size, 51 pp. This book is a part of the "Red Cross Library Series" as the book below. To see the cover and title page, click here.

  • 1895, Charles & Susan Bowles, A Nile Voyage, the second volume in "The Red Cross Library Series." A second edition was published in 1896 (Meiji 29). The first and second editions are on crepe paper and large 12mo (6 1/2 x 7 3/4 in), 73 pp and a 3 page appendix (unnumbered). In addition to color woodblocks the book contains a black and white collotype image (page 45, stone pillars). The illustrations are Egyptian subjects. Inside the front cover of the first edition (not second) is listed the address for the Red Cross Library as 21 Ashley Place, Westminster, London and notation that orders can be placed with T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, Shepheard's Hotel, Cairo and Fifth Ave Hotel, New York. The first edition has been examined with the imprint of Sampson and Low. The title page of the first edition and second editions list the complete title as A Nile Voyage of Recovery. You sometimes see the book listed with Discovery in the title but that appears to be an error. Perhaps the only Hasegawa book containing a collotype. I have seen the second edition with cloth covered hard covers (no spine covering however). For more information on the 2nd edition, click here.

  • c1895, A Few Words from T & T, (Tetsuka and Takeda), 5 x 6 1/2 in, 5 sheets of creped paper, color woodblock prints with typical images including a child playing with a samisen, lotus in a pond, a monkey eating, a flower arrangement, bonsai, and a snowscape. A private printing for the company that sold Japanese art pottery.

  • c1895, Leo Marescaux Le Japon des Enfants.

  • c1895, Calendar 1896, very small (2 1/4 x 2 3/8 in), spine covered, silk stab ties, spine covered, 14 folded crepe pages including the covers, 28 pp. Inside the front cover reads "H.B. Kendrick & Co., Objets d'Art, Japan, China, India. Los Angeles California - T. Hasegawa, 10 Hiyoshicho, Tokyo, Japan." The next page is a listing of the months and the theme for that month. The monthly calendars follow in succeding pages with calendar on the right page and a correcponding color woodblock illustration on the left page.

  • c1895, Kalender Fur Das Jarr 1896, very small, 6.2 x 6 cm.

  • 1895~7, Paul Carus, Karma, A Story of Early Buddhism, illustrated and printed by T. Hasegawa for The Open Court Publishing Co., Chicago, copyright 1894, 3rd edition (1897), 12mo (6 x 7 3/4 in - 15.2 x 19.8 cm), crepe paper, silk stab ties, spine covered, 12 folded pages - 24 pages total (including the covers). The illustrations for this book were produced by Kason Suzuki. The first edition of this book was printed on crepe paper and was published in December of 1895. It was 18 pages. The second edition was printed on both crepe and plain paper in 1896. The third edition was printed on crepe paper and published in late 1897. The third edition included revised illustrations and is a somewhat different book than the first and second edition. For more information on the third edition of the book, click here.

  • 1896, Benjamin Chappell, Glimpses of Japan, Illustrated by Kwasson, poems selected by Chappell, plain paper only. This book was republished (see ca 1911, below).

  • 1896, Emile Verhaeren Images Japonaises, Illustrations de Kwasson, Texte de Emile Verhaeren, Pubile par T. Hasegawa, 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Tokyo, plain paper, large format, French text, same images as in Glimpses of Japan, 30 pp. The book has also been reported with the 17 Kami Negishi address indication a printing of 1911 or later.

  • 1896, Emily S. Patton, Japanese Topsyturvydom, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), 1896 (Meiji 29), large size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, large 12mo (6 1/2 x 7 3/4 in - 16.3 x 19.5 cm), folded creped sheets, spine covered, string tied, 20 folded pages for a total of 40 pages (including covers). A unique, in several aspects, book published by Hasegawa. Mrs. Patton expressly intended the book for the adult reader rather than the children's book market, with the stated goal of freeing the readers of "narrow-minded prejudice" towards the Japanese. The 1896 printing carries the 10 Hiyoshi-cho Hasegawa address. A ca 1911 printing has been recorded with the 17 Kami-Negishi address. For more information on this book (1896 & ca 1911), click here.

  • 1896, K. Florenz, translated by A. Lloyd, Poetical Greetings from the Far East, Japanese Poems from the German Adaption of Dr. Karl Florenz by A. Lloyd, M.A., crepe paper, 12mo, silk stab ties, 98 numbered pages, 52 folded pages - including the covers. At least two printings of this book have been recorded. One in 1896 (10 Hiyoshi-cho address) and another ca 1911 (17 Kami Negishi address). Both were issued with folding cases. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Poetical Greetings" - 1896 Edition, VG+ Book/Poor Case, Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Poetical Greetings" - 1896 Edition, VG Book/Poor Case, Purchase Here ~~
    ~~ Available - "Poetical Greetings" - 1896 Edition, VGBook/No Case, Purchase Here ~~

  • 1896, K. Florenz, Bunten Blatter, Japanischer Poesie von Karl Florenz, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), Japanese poems translated into German K. Florenz, illustrations by Kwasson & Shoso, large 12mo (17 x 20.7 cm), hard covers, 10 folded pages. Believed to have been published in Engish as Little Songs of Shade and Sunshine (see 1908, below). Reprints by "Y. Nishinomiya's Verlag," 17 Kami Negishi were published in 1936 and 1942.

  • 1896, The Smiling Book, 17 x 22 cm, 24 pp.

  • c1896, Konni Zilliacus (translator), Japanesiska Sagor, three books translated into Swedish;Momotaro, Spariven med den Klippta Tungan and Bubben Och Trollen, 10 Hiyoshicho, Tokyo, marketed by Wentzel Hagelstam, Forlag, Helsingfors (Helsinki). To see the front covers of these books, click here.

  • 1897, Paul Carus, Nirvana, A Story of Buddhist Philosophy, illustrated and printed by T. Hasegawa (Kobunsha) for The Open Court Publishing Co., Chicago, large format 15.6 x 20.2 cm, copyright 1896, crepe paper, with silk thread tied binding and double leaves folded Japanese style, 46 pp. The illustrations for this book were produced by Kason Suzuki. This book should not be confused with later American editions published in the early 20th Century. Those books are not crepe books and do not have the high quality wookblock images in this Hasegawa book. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1897, K. Florenz, translated by A. Lloyd, White Aster - A Japanese Epic, Together with Other Poems from the German Adaptation of Prof. Dr. Karl Florenz by A. Loyd, M.A., 82 numbered pages, 94 pages total. Sold in folding case. Publisher's advertisement inside back cover with the colophon. For more information, click here.
    ~~ Available - "White Aster" - Purchase Here ~~

  • c1897, Calendar for the Year 1898, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), very small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 64mo (2 1/4 x 1 1/2 in), 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers.

  • 1897, Calendar for the Year 1899, The Months of Japanese Children, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), 8 folded crepe paper pages, 16 pages total including covers. Colophon shows a publication date of Meiji 30 (1897). To see the front cover of this book, click here.

  • 1898, Calendar for 1903, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, Meiji 32 (1898), calendar published in book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, one month per page, some pages with text, colophon on the back cover. The front cover is illustrated with storks and turtles.

  • 1898, crepe paper catalogue produced for Kelly and Walsh listing the Hasegawa titles. Starting in 1885, Kelly and Walsh began marketing Hasegawa works and a long standing working relationship much like that with the Maruzen company developed.

  • 1898, Wonderful Tea Kettle, Russian text. Appears to be the only Hasegawa book printed in Russian. Translated into Russian by Otohei Suzuki.

  • 1898, Osman Edwards, Japanese Calendar with Verses, (Calendar for 1900 in book format), Meiji 31 (1898), Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), T. Hasegawa, carries the Breitkopf & Hartel imprint in the upper right corner of the front cover, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10 x 15 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, 14 folded pages (including covers), 28 pages total. The calendar is also reported with the Breitkopf & Hartel imprint in the upper right corner of the front cover. An identical book, but with 1901 months, was produced (see below). For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1898, Osman Edwards, Japanese Calendar with Verses, (Calendar for 1901 in book format), Meiji 31 (1898), Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), T. Hasegawa, "Publisher & Art-Printer," also carries the imprint of Brentano's, Union Square, New York, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10 x 15 cm), crepe paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, 14 folded pages (including covers), 28 pages total. The book is found with the text printed in red and with it printed in black. An identical book, but with 1900 months, was produced (see above). For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Calendar with Verses" - VG+, Red Text - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1899, Osman Edwards, Residential Rhymes, Sympathecally Dedicated to Foreigners in Japan, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, Meiji 32 (1899), 8vo (7 5/8 x 10 in - 19.3 x 25.3 cm), very large for a Hasegawa book, creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, ribbon tied, 22 pages (11 folded pages) including the covers. The book is composed of eight poems, each dedicated to a particular facet of the foreigners' life in Japan. The poems are richly illustrated with related images. The only Hasegawa published book that deals specifically with the foreign community and Westerners in Meiji era Japan. This book has also been reported in plain paper format. For more information on the crepe paper book, click here.

  • 1899, Jules Adam, French book translated into English by Osman Edwards, Japanese Story-Tellers from the French of Jules Adams By Osman Edwards, Published by T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, Japan, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), Meiji 32 (1899), 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 5/8 in - 14 x 19.2 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, crepe paper in folded sheets, silk stab ties, spine covered, 32 pages (16 folded pages) including the covers. This book has also been reported in plain paper format. For more information on the crepe paper book, click here.

  • 1899, Jules Adam, Au Japon. Les Reconteurs Publics Par Jules Adam, Publics par T. Hasegawa, Tokio, Japon, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), T. Hasegawa, Meiji 32 (1899), 12mo (5 5/8 x 7 1/8 in - 14.4 x 18.3 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, creped paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk stab ties, French text, 32 pages (16 folded pages) including the covers. This book was translated into English by Osman Edwards (Japanese Story-Tellers, From the French of Jules Adam, 1899). For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1899, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street Scenes, Calendar for 1901, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), printed for Brentano's, New York, Meiji 32 (1899), 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 5/8 in - 13.8 x 19.4 cm), large size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, stab ties, spine covered, 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1899, Calendar for 1900, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), Meiji 32 (1899), small 32mo (3 1/8 x 4 5/8 in - 7.9 x 11.7 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, stab ties, spine covered.

  • 1900, Scenes du Theatre Japonais, L'Ecole de Village. (Terakoya) Drame Historique en un Acte, Traduction du Dr. Karl Florenz, Professeur a L'Universite Imperiale de Tokyo, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho), 1900 (Meiji 33), cardboard boards covered with illustrated paper with gilt lettering, 8vo (8 1/4 x 11 in - 21 x 28 cm), text in French, Honsho paper (plain paper) in folded sheets, spine covered at top and bottom only, cord ties, 1 unfolded page, 26 folded pages, 53 pages total (not including covers), numbered pages i-iii (introduction), followed by numbered pages 1-32 (the play) followed by numbered pages 1-9 (explanation of characters and the scenes). Contains notes and illustrations of the Japanese stage and depicts scenes from the historical tragedy "Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami." In specific the books depicts scenes from this play know as "Terakoya" (temple school) which is the third scene of Act IV of "Sugawara Denju Tenarai Kagami." This is a "deluxe" Hasegawa publication that was published in time for the Universal Exposition of 1900 which was held in Paris. The book is occasionally found with an illustrated folding box. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Scenes du Theatre Japonais" - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1900, Karl Florenz, Japanische Dramen: Terakoya u. Asagao, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa & Leipzig, C. F. Amelang, 1900-c1914, at least 7 editions, 12mo, crepe paper, 52 folded pages, 104 pp. For more information on the 4th, 6th & 7th editions (c1906, c1911 & 1914), click here.

  • 1900, Benjamin Chappell, "Unto the Last" - The Tokyo Home for Ex-Convicts, Methodist Publishing House, Aoyama, Tokyo, and T. Hasegawa, undated but ca 1900, folded color woodblock printed crepe paper front and back covers, spine not covered, silk tied, folded plain paper text pages, plates in halftone on single sheets with back side blank, large 18mo (4 3/4 x 7 in - 12 x 18 cm), 12 plates (three span 2 pages), 28 numbered text pages. The forward is dated March 16, 1900. For more information on this book click, here.

  • 1900, Catalogue of Japanese Lily-Bulbs, Iris, Peonies, and Other Japanese Flower Roots, Seeds and General Nursery Stock, catalogue published by T. Hasegawa, for L. Boehmer and Company. Aslo see 1908, below.

  • 1900, The Days of the Year, 1901, The Months of Japanese Children, Tokyo, small 18mo (3 7/8 x 5 3/8 in), small size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form.

  • 1900, The Months of Japanese Children, Calendar for 1902, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku), small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, 8 folded crepe paper pages, 16 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • c1900, Dawn of the Century, Calendar for 1901, published by T. Hasegawa, small size (3 x 4 1/4 in) for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, 16 pp.

  • c1900, Calendar for 1901, published by T. Hasegawa, very small size (2 1/3 x 2 1/4 in) for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form.

  • 1901, The Months of Japanese Children, Calendar for 1903, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku), small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.2 x 15 cm). Colophon shows a publication date of Meiji 34 (1901)

  • 1901, Rhymes & Life Scenes of Japan. Calendar for 1902, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshi-cho), Meiji 34 (1901), calendar published in book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, small 18mo(4 x 6 in - 10.3 x 15.2 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, 14 folded crepe paper pages (including the covers), 28 pages total. An identical edition of the book was published with the "Brentano's, 31 Union Square, New York" imprint. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1901, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street Scenes, Calendar for 1902, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.9 x 19.2 cm), large size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1901, Osman Edwards, Japanese Calendar with Verses (1901), T. Hasegawa, 14 pp with one page for each month.

  • 1901, Mary E. Unger, The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Yokohama, 1901, paper over boards cover, 8vo, 44 color woodblock illustrations of flowers and plants in numbered pages, 59 pp (63 pp ??). See 1906, below, for the second edition.

  • 1901, Jules Adam, Au Japon: Les Douze Mois De L'Anne par Jules Adam. There were at least five printings of this book. For information on the fifth printing, see 1931, below.

  • 1901, Calendar for 1903, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo with "Brentano's, New York" imprint on back cover, calendar published in book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 3 3/4 x 5 1/4 in, 8 folded crepe paper pages (including the covers), 16 pages total. Colophon inside the back cover. For more information on this book, click here.

  • c1901, Floral Pets of the East, Calendar for 1902, T. Hasegawa.

  • c1901, The Landscapes of Japan - Calendar for the Year 1902, T. Hasegawa.

  • c1901-c1926, Hasegawa wood block illustrated calendars, 12 double leaved crepe-paper pages bound as the above books, with an woodblock print illustrated calendar for each month, generally 10 x 14~15 cm but sometimes much smaller (5.5+ x 6+ cm). The calendar usually carry a title indicative of the theme of the woodblock prints presented. Also issued in 10 page versions. For more information on Hasegawa calendars, see below.

  • 1902, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street Scenes, Calendar for 1903, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.9 x 19.2 cm), large size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1902, Rhymes & Life Scenes of Japan, Calendar for 1903, T. Hasegawa Publisher & Art Printer, Tokyo (20 Honzaimoko-cho), Meiji 35 (1902), calendar published in book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 10.2 x 15.1 cm, 14 folded crepe paper pages (including the covers), 28 pages total. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1902, The Months of Japanese Ladies, Calendar for 1903, "Printed and Published by T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, Japan," Tokyo (38 Yotsuya Hommura), calendar published in a book form, small 12mo (5 x 7 in - 12.8 x 17.8 cm), spine covered, medium size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 13 folded crepe paper pages, 26 pages total including covers. Each month is represented by a color woodblock print that spans the page on the left and across the facing page (page on right). For more information on this book, click here.

  • c1902, Almanak voor 1903, Dutch language calendar.

  • 1903, Calendar for 1904, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (38 Yotsuya Honmura, Tokyo) and Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co., London, 1903, small 16mo (4 5/8 x 6 1/2 in - 10 x 14 cm), small size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 8 folded crepe paper pages, 16 pages total including covers. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1903, The Months of Japanese Ladies for 1904, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo (38 Yotsuya Hommura) and Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co., London, calendar published in a book form, small 12mo (5 x 7 in - 12.8 x 18 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, spine covered, 13 folded crepe paper pages, 26 pages total including covers. Each month is represented by a color woodblock print that spans the page on the left and across onto the page on the facing page (page on right). For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1903, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street-Scenes, Calendar for 1904, Tokyo (38 Yotsuya Hommura) calendar published in a book form, Meiji 36 (1903), 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.6 x 19 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, spine covered, 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers. Each month is represented by a color woodblock print that spans the page on the left and across the facing page (page on right). For more information on this book, click here.

  • c1903, Fourth Edition, Mary Unger, Catalogue of Japanese Plants, Bulbs, and Seeds, catalogue published by T. Hasegawa, for the L. Boehmer and Company, pictorial paper covered boards, large 8vo (18 x 24 cm), folded leaves, ca 40 color illstrations, 70 pp.

  • 1904, A Collection of Hiroshige's Masterpieces, T. Hasegawa, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 8 in - 14.5 x 20.6 cm), 8 folded pages (includes front and back cover), string tied, high quality tannish hosho paper folded over stiffener paper, 16 pp. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Collection of Hiroshige's Masterpieces" - 1904 Edition - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1904, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street Scenes, Calendar for 1905, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 13.9 x 19.2 cm), Meiji 37 (1904), large size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, 14 folded crepe paper pages, 28 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1904, The Landscapes of Tokyo, Calendar 1905, square/large 16mo (4 1/2 x 4 1/2 in - 14 x 14 cm), 1904 (Meiji 37), medium size for a Hasegawa publication, calendar published in a book form, 8 folded crepe paper pages, 16 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1904, Lafcadio Hearn, dies in Japan. Hearn contributed manuscripts for Hasegawa books. Before his death, four were published (The Boy Who Drew Cats (1st Series, #23), The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling (1st Series, #24), Chin Chin Kobakama (1st Series, #25) and The Goblin Spider (2nd Series, #1). It would be 16 years before the fifth, and last, Hearn translated book (The Fountain of Youth) was be published.

  • c1904, Electric Messages Calendar 1905, Electric Messages from Japan, A monthly Holiness Missionary Journal, 3 x 4 in, printed and published by T. Hasegawa, 8 folded pages.

  • c1904, Japanese towels (tenugui) calendar for 1905, crepe paper, 6.5 x 25 cm.

  • 1904 & c1912, Japanese Pictures of Japanese Life, T. Hasegawa, 10 folded crepe pages, 20 pp. Two books with the same title (different contents) were first published in 1895 and then later in c1905. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Japanese Pictures of Japanese Life" - c1912 Edition - Purchase Here ~~

  • c1905, Japanese Pictures of Japanese Life, T. Hasegawa, 38 Honmura-cho, 12mo, 9 folded crepe paper pages (including front and back cover), double string ties, reprint, 18 pp. The 38 Honmura-cho address for Hasegawa is printed at the bottom of the back cover. The colophon still carries the 10 Hiyoshi-cho address. The first edition of this book was published in 1895 (see above). A book with the same title but different woodblock plates was published 1904 (see below). In an advertisement published in 1906, Hasegawa lists a "Vol II" of this book. I have not confirmed that book however. For more information on this c1905, reprint, click here.

  • 1905, Hair-Pin Calendar for 1906, square 16mo (5 3/8 x 5 3/8 in - 13.8 x 13.8 cm), unusual format (square) for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, crepe paper, single silk tie, 8 folded pages, 16 pages total including covers. While the book is square, it is printed and tied to be read in a diamond format (cocked 45 degrees up and tied in the lower left corner). Because of the format, the folded (unseperated) edge on each page is the upper right edge. The first page is an introduction. The next 12 pages each contain a one month calendar and woodblock illustrations applicable to that month and the associated hair-pin. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1905, Julia D. Carrothers, Japan's Year, Illustrated by Japanese Artists, 1905 (Meiji 38), T. Hasegawa, 38 Yotsuya Hommura, Tokyo, blue cloth over boards covers embroidered with gold thread, silk ties or illustrated stiff wraps with thick string Yotsume toji binding, three single sheet crepe paper woodblock prints and the balance of the book is folded plain paper, 16 full page color woodblocks in addition to the 3 printed on crepe paper, numerous partial page color woodblock text illustrations, 8vo (7 1/8 x 9 3/4 in - 18 x 25 cm), 76 numbered pages (38 folded pages plus 3 single pages). The three single sheet crepe woodblock illustrations are not included in the numbered pages of 76. A majority of the text pages have woodblock print illustrations. Pages 75-76 are a listing of T. Hasegawa books. An unusual Hasegawa book because it contains color woodblock prints on crepe and non-crepe paper. The book was later reprinted by "Nishinomiya, Successor, 17 Kami Negishi." The colophon in the reprint repeats the original publication and printing date of 1905 (Meiji 38). However, the Nishinomiya imprint found inside the back cover puts the publication date at 1911 or later. This reprint has cloth over paper covers and simple string ties. For more information on the illustrates stiff wraps version of this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Japan's Year" - Stiff Wraps - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1905, Monthly Changes of Japanese Street-Scenes, Calendar for 1906, 20 cm, 24 pp.

  • c1905, Masterpieces by Hiroshige, Collection II, T. Hasegawa, no colophon, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 8 in - 14.5 x 20.6 cm), 8 fold pages (includes front and back cover), high quality tannish hosho paper folded over stiffener paper, 16 pp. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Masterpieces by Hiroshige, Collection II" - Stiff Silk Wraps - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1906, Selections from Hokusai's Views of Mount Fuji, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, 1906, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 8 in - 14.5 x 20.6 cm), 8 double fold pages (includes front and back cover), high quality tannish hosho paper folded over stiffener paper, one string tie, 16 pp. Twelve pages of color woodblock reproductions of Hokusai's works. Sometimes sold in a wooden box. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Selections from Hokusai's Views of Mount Fuji" - Stiff Silk Wraps - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1906, Mary E. Unger, The Favorite Flowers of Japan, T. Hasegawa, Second Edition, Tokyo (38 Yotsuya Hommura), 1906 (Meiji  39), Third Edition, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi-cho), 1911 (Meiji 44), Fourth Edition, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi-cho), 1935, large 8vo (7 1/8 x 9 5/8 in - 18 x 24.5 cm), paper over boards with color woodblock illustrations front and back, spine covered, hosho paper, 59 numbered pages. Including the inside front cover, there are 9 unnumbered pages at the front. These are followed by 59 numbered pages. At the rear of the 2nd edition there are 4 additional unnumbered pages (only 2 additional pages in the 3rd & 4th editions). Inside the front cover is a full page color woodblock of a Japanese garden. Each of the folded pages has been glued together along the left edge (fore edge). The book is composed of 35 (2nd edition) or 34 (3rd edition) folded pages of high quality hosho paper and 2 single pages which are affixed to the back of the front and back covers. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Favorite Flowers of Japan" - 1911, 3rd Ed - Purchase Here ~~

  • 1906, advertisement/listing of publications published in Favorite Flowers of Japan, 2nd edition (above), click here.

  • c1906, The Months of Japanese Children, Calendar for 1907, calendar published in a book form, 5 1/2 in square format printed to be viewed canted 90 degrees to the right (diamond/diagonal format), silk stab tie in left corner, each month on separate page.

  • c1907, Japanese Street Scenes, Calendar for 1908, calendar in book format, crepe paper, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in), medium size for a Hasegawa book, spine covered with linen type tape which extends onto the covers, 26 pp (including the covers). Each monthly calendar is presented within a continuous woodblock print that spans the two facing pages. The book is not in the typical folded page format. Rather, the outside edges of adjoining pages are affixed. This is the same format as the Sword and Blossom books (see below). The book has been reported accompanied by a 4 1/2 x 6 1/2 in woodblock illustrated thick plain paper card which probably was intended to accompany the calendar and include notes or inscriptions of a personal nature. To see the front cover and representative pages, click here.

  • c1907, Calendar set for 1908. Not in book format. Each month is on a sperate piece with a small fold-over type holder. To see this calendar set, click here.

  • c1907, Calendar for 1908, calendar published in a book form, 18mo (4 x 6 in) spine covered, silk stab ties, 7 folded crepe paper pages including covers. T. Hasegawa and colophon on back cover. To see the front cover, click here.

  • c1907, Calendar for 1908, (publisher unknown), small 48mo (2 1/2 x 3 in - 6.7 x 7.6 cm), a very small calendar published in a book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 13 folded crepe paper pages including covers. See c1908 and c1909, below, for similar calendars for 1909 and 1910. For more information on this calendar, click here.

  • 1907~c1914, Shotaro Kimura and Charlotte M. A. Peake, Sword and Blossom: Poems from the Japanese, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, color woodblock color illustrations, large 16mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.5 x 18 cm), crepe over padded board covers, hosho paper (high quality paper) pages, 3 volume set, 122 pp (34 pp + 34 pp + 54 pp). The "Blossom" poems are short unrhymed verse known as Tanka which date from ca 900 AD. The "Sword" poems are Chinese poems by Japanese writers from a more modern time. The 3rd volume also contains a section of "Love" poems which were also written pre-10th Century. . The first volume of this three book series was first published in 1907 (34 pp). Each volume had at least two printings between 1907 and c1914. The three books were marketed as a set and sold in a wrap-around case (dark blue with "Sword and Blossom Poems" in silver on the spine of the case and with ivory clasps). To see this case, click here. The set was also marketed in a blue wrap-around case with ivory clasps with no lettering. To see this case, click here.
    For more information on Vol I (1st & 2nd ed) of the 3 volume set , click here.
    For more information on Vol II of the 3 volume set , click here.
    For more information on Vol III of the 3 volume set , click here.
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol I, II & III, 38 Yotsuya Hommura Address) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol I, II & III, 17 Kami Negishi Address) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol I, 2nd ed, 38 Yotsuya Hommura Address) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol II, 38 Yotsuya Hommura Address) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol III, 38 Yotsuya Hommura Address) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Sword & Blossom Poems" (Vol III, 17 Kami Negishi Address) - Purchase Here ~

    German Language Versions. 1914~1925, Manfred Schneider, Blueten und Schwert Lieder (cover), Blueten und Schwerter Lieder Nachdichtunsen, Japanischer Lieder von Manfred Schneider, Buchschmuck von Japanischen Kunstlern (title page), T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, 17 Kamai Negishi address, 3 volumes each numbered on the title page. Covers (padded and illustrated) as in the English language versions. Volume 1: Taisho 3 (1914) or Taisho 11 (1922), Volume 2: Taisho 10 (1921) & Volume 3: Taisho 14 (1925).
    For more information on Vol I of the 3 volume set , click here.

  • 1908, G.J., illustrated by Kwasson A. Shoso, Little Songs of Shade and Sunshine, Tokyo, Hasegawa (38 Yotsuya Hommura), 2nd printing, large 12mo (6 1/2 x 8 in - 16.5 x 20.1 cm), 10 double fold pages of tannish hosho paper, 20 pp. Book of Japanese poems and songs. Perhaps an English language version of the German language book Bunte Blatter: Japanische Poesie (see 1896, above). For more information on this book, click here. A facsimile edition of this book is occassionally seen in book listings. It is generally dated to ca 1960 and said to lack the colophon or contain only a partial colophon.

  • 1908, Calendar for 1909, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, 1908, calendar published in a book form, vertical 32mo (3 x 5 1/4 in - 7.4 x 13 cm), spine covered, very small size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 6 folded crepe paper pages, 12 pages total including covers. Most months are represented by a color woodblock print on a single page. July & August and October & November are two months to a page. For more information on this calendar, click here.

  • c1908, L. Boehmer & Co Catalogue (Cover) - Catalogue of Japanese Plants, Bulbs and Seeds (Title Page), 4th edition, catalogue published by T. Hasegawa, for L. Boehmer and Company, pictorial paper covered boards , plain paper, 42 color woodblock illustrations, 70 pp.

  • c1908, Twelve Scenes by Moonlight - Calendar for 1909, Hasegawa, 5 1/2 in square.

  • c1908, Calendar for 1909, (publisher unknown), small 48mo (2 1/2 x 3 in - 6.7 x 7.6 cm), a very small calendar published in a book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 13 folded crepe paper pages including covers. See c1907, above, and c1909, below, for similar calendars for 1908 and 1910. For more information on this calendar, click here.

  • 1909, Calendar for 1910, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, 1909, calendar published in a book form, tiny - large 64mo (3 1/8 x 2 in - 8 x 5 cm), spine covered, very small size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 8 folded crepe paper pages, 16 pages total including covers. Each month is represented by a color woodblock print on a single page. There is not text accompanying the monthly calendars. For more information on this calendar, click here.

  • c1909, Street Scenes of Old Japan - Calendar for 1910, 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 14 x 19.2 cm), spine covered, medium size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 13 folded crepe paper pages. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • c1909, Calendar for 1910, large 48mo (3 x 4 1/4 in), small size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 7 folded crepe paper pages (14 pages total including the covers). The front cover shows two farmers in a rice paddy. The back cover shows five large pines in the foreground and a cabin in the background. There is no colophon. The back cover has the imprint "T. Hasegawa, Publisher, Tokyo."

  • c1909, Calendar for 1910, (publisher unknown), small 48mo (2 1/2 x 3 in - 6.7 x 7.6 cm), a very small calendar published in a book form, spine covered, silk stab ties, 13 folded crepe paper pages including covers. See c1907 and c1908, above, for similar calendars for 1908 and 1909. For more information on this calendar, click here.
    ~ Available - "Calendar for 1910" - Purchase Here ~

  • 1910, Great Masters of Ukiyoe, Calendar for 1911, large 18mo (7 3/8 x 4 7/8 in - 18.8 x 12.3 cm), medium size for a Hasegawa book, calendar published in a book form, plain paper, 5 folded pages, 10 pages total including covers. For more information on this publication, click here.

  • 1910, Calendar for 1911, Chiari di Luna al Giappone, T. Hasegawa, Tokyo, 1910 (Meiji 43), large 12mo (14 x 19 cm), folded crepe pages, stab ties, 14 pages (7 folded pages) including the covers. The only text is the months and they are in Italian.

  • c1910, Karl Florenz, Japanische Dichtungen, Dichter-Grusse aus Dem Osten Florenz, T. Hasegawa, 38 Yotsuya Hommura, Tokyo, 93 pp. Several editions. the latest I have seen was the 14th edition, 1912.

  • c1910, creped advertising brochure for H.B. Kendrick & Co, Los Angeles, 4 pp.

  • c1910, Calendar for 1911, Shimbi Shoin, Tokyo, c1910, 32mo (3 5/8 x 5 1/4 in - 9.2 x 13 cm), folded crepe pages, silk string tied, 10 pages (5 folded pages) including the covers. All pages except the back cover have color woodblock prints. The calendars are presented two months per page. For more information on this item, click here. According to Frederic A. Sharf, T. Hasegawa produced a series of 1911 calendars for the Shimbi Shoin.

  • 1911, Mary E. Unger, The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Hasegawa, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), 8vo (7 1/8 x 9 5/8 in), bound in stiff boards covered with cloth textured woodblock illustration, rice paper covering on the spine, 29 color woodblock prints of flowers and a map of the Japanese Empire, 59 pp. Printed on high quality handmade paper (not creped). Reported with a folding case. A later edition of the book, also on plain paper, was published in 1935.

  • c1911, Benjamin Chappell, Glimpses of Japan, Illustrated by Kwasson, Tokyo (10 Hiyoshicho in colophon but Kami Negishi-cho on front cover), T. Hasegawa, ca 1911, large horizontal 8vo (11 x 8 in - 27.7 x 20.4 cm), large size for a Hasegawa book, plain (hosho) paper, silk ties, spine covered, 30 folded pages including covers. The book carries the imprint of "T. Hasegawa, Kami Negishi, Tokyo, Japan" in the bottom left corner of the front cover. This is a republication of this book. See 1896, above, for the original publication. For more information on this ca 1911 publication, click here.

  • c1911, Calendar for 1912, Landscapes by Hiroshige, "Printed and Published by T. Hasegawa," 4 x 6 in, each month on a separate page.

  • c1911, Moonlight Scenes of Japan, Calendar for 1911, published by T. Hasegawa crepe paper.

  • 1912, Benjamin Chappell, Moonlight Scenes of Japan, published by T. Hasegawa, calendar?

  • c1912, Calendar for 1913, published by T. Hasegawa, 3 x 4 1/2 in.

  • c1912, Great Masters of Yukiyoe School, Calendar for 1913, published by T. Hasegawa, plain paper, 5 folded pages, 10 pages total including the covers.

  • 1913, Calendar for 1914, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, calendar published in a book form, teeny-tiny - small 64mo (2 1/8 x 1 7/8 in - 5.5 x 4.6 cm), spine covered, very very small size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 12 folded crepe paper pages, 24 pages total including covers. Each month is represented by a color woodblock print on a single page. The facing page has an illustration related to the month. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1914, A Collection of Hiroshige's Masterpieces: Collection III, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 8 in - 14.5 x 20.6 cm), 8 fold pages (includes front and back cover), high quality tannish hosho paper folded over stiffener paper, 16 pp. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1914, Selections from Hokusai: Collection II.

  • c1914, Charlotte M.A. Peake, Scattered Blossoms: Japanese Poems. The same material was released as a calendar in 1916.

  • c1914, Street Scenes of Old Japan - Calendar for 1915.

  • 1917, Monthis of Japanese Children - Calendar for 1918, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, Taisho 7 (1917), calendar published in a book form, small small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 12.2 x 15 cm), spine covered, small size for a Hasegawa book, silk stab ties, 7 folded crepe paper pages, 14 pages total including covers. For more information on this book, click here.

  • c1920s~1930s, Miniature Prints (Post Card Size Prints & Postal Cards), T. Hasegawa or successor Y. Nishinomiya. These miniature (3 1/2 x 5 1/2 in - 9 x 14 cm) woodblock prints were made on postal card size thick paper. The cards were produced with and without postal card indicia on the back. Two cards have been examined which carry "Imprime par T. Hasegawa" (Mont Fuji par Hokusai and Saruhashi par Hiroshige). Some have "TH" on the image and others contain no Hasegawa or Nishinomiya indicia. Examples of these prints are shown here, here, here and here. An example of a set of 6 in a wrap-around sheet is here.
    ~ Available - Miniature Print "Seta Omi" - Purchase Here ~

  • c1921, hanging Calendar for 1922, T. Hasegawa, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, 12 3/4 x 6 1/2 in - 32.6 x 16.6 cm overall size, a single tipped on woodblock print (8 1/8 x 4 3/4 in - 20.6 x 12.2 cm) bordered in gold. The woodblock reproduces "Three Ladies on a Beach" by Fujimaro Kitagawa (1790-1850). The small monthly calendars are match box size (2 3/4 x 1 1/2 in - 6.7 x 4 cm) and are tipped to one another with a cover reading "Calendar for 1922." There is a large dark blue hanging tie which ends in a tassel over the woodblock. For more information on this calendar, click here.

  • 1922, Evaleen Stein, Little Poems from Japanese Anthologies, Rendered into English Verse by Evaleen Stein, Illustrated by Japanese Artists, Tokyo (Kami Negishi), colophon dated Teisho 11 (1922), small 12mo (5 x 7 in - 12.5 x 18 cm), padded color woodblock illustrated crepe over hard boards, bound Western style with no stab ties, internal pages plain (hosho) paper, printed on one side only with outside edges of adjoining pages glued together, spine covered, 36 pages (includes title page and blank page at the end. The poems presented are taken from two Japanese anthologies, the Manyoshiu and Kokinshiu, from the ninth and tenth centuries. For more information on this book, click here.

  • 1922, Hearn, Lafcadio,The Fountain of Youth - Japanese Fairy Tale, large 12mo (5 1/2 x 7 1/2 in - 14 x 19.5 cm), 9 folded pages (including front and back cover), crepe paper, two silk stab ties, 18 pages total including the covers. Other printings include 1925 and 1930. For more information on this book, and the 1925 printing in specific, click here.
    ~~ Available - "The Fountain of Youth" (1925 Printing) - Purchase Here ~~

  • c1922. In a c1922 catalogue of books and prints by the Hasegawa Publishing Company, the following were offered in the book section under the heading of "Albums."
    All in the Original Size and Color
    • The Eight Views in the Suburbs of Yedo by Hiroshige $15.00
    • The Eight Views of Omi by Hiroshige $15.00
    • Selections from the Views around Mount Fuji by Hokusai $15.00
    • Selections from the Views on the Kisokaido by Hiroshige $15.00
    • Selections from the Famous Hundred Sights of Yedo by Hiroshige $15.00
    • Selections from the ... Places in Home Provinces by Hiroshige $15.00
    • A Collection of the Masterpieces by Utamaro, Eishi etc. $25.00
    • Fifty-five Views along the Tokaido Road by Hiroshige $50.00

  • 1927, Moonlight Scenes of Japan, Calendar for 1928, 20 cm, 12 pp.

  • 1931, Jules Adam, Au Japon, Les Douze Mois de l'Anne par Jules Adam, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi), T. Hasegawa, 1931 (Showa 6), fifth printing, small size for a Hasegawa/Kobunsha book, 18mo (4 x 6 1/2 in - 10 x 16 cm), text in French, silk stab ties, spine covered, creped paper in folded sheets, 14 folded pages (including covers), 28 pages total. For more inforamtion on this book, click here.

  • 1931 & 1949, Leo Marescaux, Life Scenes of Japan, Text by Leo Marescaux, T. Hasegawa Publisher & Art Printer, Tokyo (17 Kami Negishi-cho), 1st edition - Showa 6 (1931) and 2nd edition - Showa 34 (1949), spine covered, silk stab ties, 4 x 6 in - 10.1 x 15.2 cm, 14 folded crepe paper pages (including the covers), 28 pages total. Each month illustrated and discussed on a facing page. This book has the months of the year but not a day by day calendar. The 1949 printing carries an imprint reading "Published by Y. Nishinomiya" as opposed to the T. Hasegawa imprint. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~~ Available - "Life Scenes in Japan" (1949 Printing) - Purchase Here ~~

  • c1932, Purse calendar, calendar for 1933 with crepe -paper padded covers shaped like a purse with draw strings "for 1933" on the front cover, 9 x 15 cm.

  • c1933, Lucky Shell calendar, calendar for 1934 with crepe paper padded covers shaped like a shell with "Lucky Shell" on the front cover, 9 x 12 cm.

  • 1936, Leo Marescaux, La Japon Des Enfants, Showa 11 (1936), 20 cm, 20 pp.

  • c1938, Hare calendar, calendar for 1939 with crepe paper padded covers with image of a hare, 9 x 13 cm.

  • ca 1940, Process of Wood-block Printing, Tokyo, Nishinomiya & Hasegawa, Inc., 12mo (7 1/8 x 5 in - 18 x 12.5 cm), not dated but believed to be ca 1940, decorative cloth cover, horizontal format with pages bound in foldout (accordion) style, 30 pages total. This book provides step by step illustrations of the creation of a color woodblock print. For more information on this book, click here.
    ~ Available - "Process of Wood-block Printing" (14 step process) - Purchase Here ~
    ~ Available - "Process of Wood-block Printing" (13 step process) - Purchase Here ~

  • Post-1940. Very few Hasegawa books are seen that can positively be identified to the post-1940 period. A very small (ca 5 x 4 cm) crepe book type calendar for 1960 with the Hasegawa imprint has been confirmed. There is evidence that Nishinomiya, and then his son, continued to produce individual woodblock prints from the famous Hasegawa's Night Scenes series of prints for many years (perhaps even today).

  • 1942. Very modern Hasegawa/Nishinomiya Japanese Fairy Tale books that I have examined are:

    • The Goblin Spider, no Fairy Tale number, part of a five book L. Hearn set, Y. Nishinomiya, Publisher and Art-printer, Successor to T. Hasegawa, 17 Kami Negishi, Tokyo, colophon date of Showa 17 (1942).4. For more information on this book, click here.
    • German edition of Momotaro. Japanische Marchen, Momotaro, Tokyo, T. Hasegawa, colophon Showa 17 (1942).9, 4 x 6 in, 11 folded pages. To see the covers and book list in this book, click here.

  • 1957. The most recently published Hasegawa/Nishinomiya Japanese Fairy Tale book that I have examined is the Matsuyama Mirror which carries a publication date of Showa 32 (1957). Information on that book is here.

  • ??, Koto Okura The Russo-Japanese War, Hasegawa, unusually large format (8 x 12 in), 14 pp.

  • ??, crepe advertising brochure for A.A. Vantine & Co of NY, 6 pp.
 
Nishinomiya Prints. 1918//????, Hasegawa's Night Scenes Series. Hasegawa, under the Nishinomiya imprint/seal, marketed 21 different night scenes woodcuts printed primarily in blue and black inks. These "chuban-sized" prints (each about 7 1/4 x 10 inches) are often characterized as reflecting the essence of prints of the early "shin-hanga" era of Japanese print-making. Information (with pictures) on these prints can be found here. While these prints may carry seals such as Hiroshige, they are actually reproductions of the original art created by artists for the Nishinomiya firm. Apparently these prints are currently being replicated and offered on the market. For the seals and inscriptions used by Hasegawa and Nishinomiya on art prints, I recommend you consult this site

Reproductions of Masterpieces c1907 (1907 or earlier) as listed in The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Second Edition:

  • Hiroshige's Rainy Night ("large picture reproduced from his autograph")
  • Hiroshige's Tokaido Sceneries: Mishima, Kambara, Kakegawa, Fukuroi, Goyu, Yokkaichi, Seki, Shono, Sakanoshita, Shinagawa, etc.
  • Hiroshige's The Views of Yedo Suburgs: Gyotoku, Haneda, Asukayama, Azumanomori, Tamagawa, etc.
  • Hiroshige's Yoshino
  • Hiroshige's Suma
  • Hiroshige's Saruhashi
  • Hiroshige's Lake Biwa
  • Hokusai's Mount Fuji
  • Hokusai's Kikiyo
  • Hokusai's Boiling Billows
  • Utamaru's Egrets and Cormorant
  • Utamara's Figures (more than one)
  • Eishi's Figures
  • Harunobu's Figures
  • Anonymous Figures
  • Toyokuni's Figures

Hasegawa Calendars. Hasegawa produced a large number of calendars, both crepe and regular paper. His first calendar was a small one produced in 1894. By 1897 the Hasegawa calendar had developed into a format very similar to the crepe books. The book type calendars had front and back covers and were string tied. A theme was carried throughout the calendar in the illustrations and accompanying text. Each month was normally on a separate page. Wenckstern notes the following for 1906 alone:

Book Form on Crepe Paper (unless noted otherwise). In the later years these calendars were printed in a very small format (ca 2 1/2 x 3 in). To see an example of such a calendar from 1907, click here.

  • Monthly Changes of Japanese Street Scenes
  • Calendar with Little Selections of Old Prints (regular paper)
  • The Months of Japanese Children
  • Hairpin Calendar for 1906
  • Japanese Towels
  • Japanese Sceneries (in different sizes)
Hanging Calendars.
  • The Months of Japanese Ladies
  • Hiroshige's Masterpieces in "Kakemono"
  • The Favorite Flowers of Japan
  • Japanese Sceneries in "Kakemono"
  • Hiroshige's Masterpiece
  • The Silhouettes in "Kakemono"
  • Japanese Towels
  • Pagoda
  • The Tower of Nagoya Castle

Non-Traditional Format Calendars. Hasegawa's calendars were often innovative and not necessarily in a traditional book format. Hasegawa calendars for the following years are reported in shapes corresponding to the theme.

  • 1905 - Japanese Towels (6.5 x 25 cm)
  • 1910 - Each month on separate sheet with folding holder, plain paper
  • 1933 - Lucky Bag - padded crepe-paper covers (9 x 15 cm)
  • 1937 - Lucky Shell - padded crepe-paper covers (9 x 12 cm)
  • 1939 - Lucky Hare - padded crepe-paper covers (9 x 13 cm)
 
Calanders c1907 (1907 or earlier) as listed in The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Second Edition:

Bookform on Crepe Paper:

  • Japanese Street Scenes
  • Calendar on Flower Cards
  • The Months of Japanese Children
  • Hairpin Calendar
  • Calendar in Japanese Towels
  • Japanese Sceneries (4 x 5 1/4 in)
  • Japanese Sceneries (3 x 4 1/4 in)
  • Japanese Sceneries (2 x 2 1/2 in)

Hanging Calendars

  • Japanese Ladies and Street Scenes
  • The Favorite Flowers of Japan
  • Hokusai's Masterpieces
  • Hiroshige's Masterpiece
  • Japanese Sceneries in "Kakemono"
  • The Silhouttes in "Kakemono"
  • Japanese Towels
  • Wistaria
  • Pagoda
   
Hasegawa Picture Post Cards. Hasegawa also produced color woodblock illustrated post cards. These can be identified by the initials "T.H." which is usually found at the bottom. These cards usually have a descriptive caption in English. The following post cards are listed in The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Second Edition:

  • Tokyo Sceneries (set of 6 cards)
  • Kyoto Sceneries (set of 6 cards)
  • Tokaido Sceneries (set of 6 cards)
  • Comic Sketches of the War (set of 6 cards)
  • Crepe Paper Picture Postcard (set of 12)
  • Celebrated Landscapes of Japan by Hiroshige (collection of 12)
  • Little Masterpieces by Hiroshige and Hokusai (set of 6)
 
Individual Pictures (handprinted in coloured wood-cuts on hosho paper) as listed in The Favorite Flowers of Japan, Second Edition:

  • Japanese Ladies and Street Scenes by Yoshimune
  • The Birds by Kwasson
  • The Flowers by Shoso

 


Matsumuro Japanese Fairy Tale Series
in English - Crepe Paper

 
Matsumuro Yachizo, Japanese fairy tales on crepe paper, Meiji 33 (1900), covers in color. I believe the internal wookblock illustrations are black and white. Titles are (T. Hasegawa equivalent book in brackets [ ] ):

  • The Old Tale of Bubuku Chagama [The Wonderful Tea-Kettle, No. 16 ]
  • The Ord (Old) Tale of Tongue Cotted (Cut) Sparrow [The Tongue-Cut Sparrow, No. 2]
  • The Story of a Wen Taker [Old Man and the Devils, No. 7]
  • The Story of Hana Sakashi Jiji [Old Man who Made the Dead Trees Blossom, No. 4]
  • The Story of the Kachi-Kachi Mountain [Kachi Kachi Mountain, No. 5]
  • The Story of Kintaro [no equivalent T. Hasegawa book]
  • The Story of Matsuyama Kagami [The Matsuyama Mirror, No. 10]
  • The Story of Momotaro [Momotaro, No. 1]
  • The Story of the Battle Between a Monkey and a Crab [Battle of the Monkey and the Crab, No. 3]
  • The Story of Urashimataro [The Fisher-Boy Urashima, No. 8].

 


Similar Crepe Paper Color Woodblock Print Books
(Not Takejiro Hasegawa)

 
1893, Forty Seven Ronin, Yokohama, Kelly & Walsh, colophon dated Meiji 26 (1893), small 16mo (4 1/2 x 6 1/4 in - 11.5 x 16 cm), folded crepe paper pages, red string stab ties, spine covered only at top and bottom (ca 2 cm), text in English, large full page fold-out wood-cut printed on one side only (3 folds out 1 fold up - 9 x 13 in - 23.4 x 33.8 cm), 36 folded pages (including covers), 73 pages total. A similar book has been reported. That book (36 crepe sheets - 72 pp + one page folding woodblock) dated Meiji 40 (1908) was attributed to T. Hasegawa with the art attributed to Yoshimune. For more information on the 1893 book, click here.

Other Editions:

1907 & 1910. A book with the same title and same images was printed and published in 1907 (Meiji 40) and reprinted and distributed in 1910 (Meiji 43). The 1910 reprint is plain paper. To see the cover and colphon of the 1910 reprinted book here.

1894, The Rokkasen, The Illustrated Poems by the Six Poetical Geniuses, Yokohama, Akiyama Aisaburo, published by Kelly & Waslh, Ltd., illusrations by Sisen, Meiji 27 (1894), horizontal 8vo (25.5 x 18.5 cm), 2 silk (gold) ties, 9 folded pages, 18 pages total (including covers). The six poetical geniuses are: Ono No Komachi, Arihara no Narihara Ason, Sojo Kenjio, Bunya no Yasuhide, Kisen Koshi & Otomo no Kuronushi. The preface, inside of the front cover, is dated December 1894.

1894, A Pocket Guide for the Land of the Rising Sun, Akiyama Aisaburo, published by Kokubunsha., 18 cnm, 32 pp.

1894, Choix de Fables de La Fontaine, Illustree par un Groupe des Meilleurs Artistes de Tokio, Sous la Direction of P. Barboutau, 2 volumes (tomes), Tokyo, Imprimerie de Tsoukidji-Tokio, S. Magata, Directeur, Meiji 27 (1894), 8vo (7 1/4 x 9 7/8 in - 18.5 x 25.1 cm), plain paper in folded sheets, spine covered, silk string ties (two crossed at the top and two crossed at the bottom). Volume 1 has 54 pages (27 folded pages) total including covers. Each volume is richly illustrated with 14 color woodblocks that span two adjacent pages. The book was issued in two types of plain paper and in crepe paper. The plain paper being larger in size than the crepe. The plain paper books were issued numbered (Nos. 1-350) and unnumbered. For more information on an unnumbered plain paper volume 1, click here.
 
1895, Fables Choisies de Florian. De J.-P. Claris, De Florian, Illustree Par Des Artistes Japonais Sous La Direction De P. Barboutau, Tokio, Volumes 1 & 2, Paris, Librairie Marpon & Flammarion, E. Flammarion Succ., "Imprime par la compagnie de Shueisha a Tokio," 2 volumes (tomes), Meiji 28 (1895), small 8vo (6 x 8 in - 15 x 20.1 cm), crepe paper (Ho-sho) in folded sheets, spine covered, silk string ties, text in French, 56 pages total (each volume) including the covers (28 folded pages). In each volume there are 24 numbered pages of text and fourteen double page color woodblock prints. The fourteen double page plates (28 pp) and the front and back covers (4 pages) are not numbered. The front covers are a single page color woodblock print. The cover woodblock print and the 14 internal double page woodblock prints all have the artist's seal (han). In total the two books contain 112 pages which include 28 double page color woodblock prints and 48 numbered pages of text. There are 38 (18 in volume 1 and 20 in volume 2) small text type black and white woodcut illustrations of birds, animals and plants interspersed throughout the book. Both this version and the plain paper version (see next below) are designated as "Exemplaires de Luxe." This version has a limitation statement of 200 copies. For more information on this set, click here.
~~ Available - "Fables Choisies de Florian, Volume 1 & 2," Crepe Paper - Purchase Here ~~
~~ Available - "Fables Choisies de Florian, Volume 1 (Rebound)," Crepe Paper - Purchase Here ~~

1895, Fables Choisies de Florian. De J.-P. Claris, De Florian, Illustree Par Des Artistes Japonais Sous La Direction De P. Barboutau, Tokio, Volumes 1 & 2, Paris, Librairie Marpon & Flammarion, E. Flammarion Succ., "Imprime par la compagnie de Shueisha a Tokio," 2 volumes (tomes) generally found bound together into one book, western style (horizontal format, no string ties), plain paper (Tori-noko), Meiji 28 (1895), 8vo (24 x 33.5 cm), hard boards with decorative covering and paste on label, text in French, 30 full page color wood block prints, 72 pages. This version has a limitation statement of 190 copies. The fables and illustrations are different from those found in the crepe paper version.

1895, Okada Matsuo, The Japanese Months with Illustrations, Vol I & II, stated Second Edition, The Kokubunsha, Tokyo, 1895. Colophon indicates a printing date of 1894 (Meiji 27) so perhaps that is when the first edition was printed. For more information on this set, click here. Essentially the same book was published in 1894 without the Kokubunsha imprint. To see volume II from this set which was designated "Fourth Edition," click here. For a side by side comparison of Vol II of the "Second" and "Fourth" editions, click here. In 1980 the Toyodo published a plain paper facsimile edition of a book with the same title bearing the The Toyodo imprint dated 1898, 56 pages and stated "Third Edition."

1895, Scenes from the Japan-China War, "Text by Jukichi Inouye; Illustrations by Eiki Yamamoto, Published by Shobei Inaba (No. 2 Fukiyacho, Nihonbashi-ku, Tokyo, Printed at Tokyo-Seishi-Bunsha," Meiji 28 (1895), 20 x 27 cm, crepe paper, 16 folded pages (including the covers). To see the front cover, title page and colophon, click here.

1895, Musical Japan by Miss Dulcie Harmony, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokio, distributed by Kelly & Walsh, Meiji 28 (1895), oblong 8vo (9 1/2 x 7 in - 24 x 16.2 cm), red silk stab ties, spine covered, 9 folded pages, 18 pages total, including the covers. The cover carries the name of "Chikanobu Yoshu" in Japanese which is the pseudonym for the artist Chikanobu Hashimoto. For more information on this book, click here. It appears that a larger format version ( 25 x 34 cm - 8 pp) was published in 1894.
~~ Available - "Musical Japan" - Good - Purchase Here ~~

1895, S.L.G., "My Japanese" A Topical Song of Japan, Words and Music by S.L.G, Yokohama, Kelly & Walsh, Meiji 28 (1895), small 8vo (6 3/8 x 8 in - 16.2 x 20.1 cm), English language, string tied, double fold crepe paper, color woodblocks on all pages, 20 pages (10 double fold pages) including covers. The book has no title page. There is a colophon on the back cover. "S.L.G" is believed to be Dr. Sidney Lewis Gulick (1860-1945), an American missionary living in Japan at the time. For more information on this book, click here.

1895, Japanese Customs from Ancient to Modern (2 volumes), published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokio, vertical format.

1896, Floral Japan by Miss Flora Sweet, Meiji 29, 8 x 10 in, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, No. 16, Sakurada, Hongo-cho, Shibi, Tokio, Japan, folded crepe pages, stab tied, 10 full page color woodblock plates and color woodblock illustrations on the front and back covers. This may be the third printing. "Miss Flora Sweet" is stated on the title page but not on the cover.

1896, Ceremonial Japan by Miss Dolly Belle, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokyo, Meiji 29 (1896).3.23, large 8vo (9 3/4 x 7 1/4 in - 24.5 x 18 cm), unpaginated, folded crepe pages, 9 folded pages (including front and back cover), 10 full page color woodblocks (includes covers), stab ties, 18 pages total. For more information on this book, click here.

1896, The Obasan and the Pig, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokyo, Meiji 29 (1896), 15 cm, 7 pp.

1896, Japanese Exhibition Catalogue, ("Toyo no Hana"), Louis Williams, horizontal format, 18.3 x 23.8.

1904, The Russo-Japanese War, published by Hasegawa Sonokichi, Tokyo, 1904, horizontal 8vo, stab ties, crepe paper, 14 folded pages, 6 color woodblock prints with descriptive titles, other smaller illustrations on text pages. To see the front cover and some of the woodblock prints, click here.

ca 1907, Calendar for 1907, Tokyo, Isekin & Co., c1907, 48mo (3 x 2 1/2 in), folded crepe paper, color woodblock illustration on all pages, stab tied, spine covered, 26 pages (13 folded) including front and back covers. The imprint on the back cover reads "Manufactured by Isekin & Co."

ca 1908, Calendar for 1908, Tokyo, Isekin & Co., c1908, 48mo (3 x 3 1/2 in - 7.5 x 9 cm), folded crepe paper, color woodblock illustration on all pages, stab tied, spine covered, 16 pages (8 folded) including front and back covers. The imprint on the back cover reads "Manufactured by Isekin & Co., Nihonbashiku, Tokyo, Japan." For more information on this book, click here.

1910, Frederick Starr, Japanese Proverbs and Pictures, Selected and Edited by Frederick Starr, Chicago and Tokyo, printed by H. Hattori, Tokyo, 1910, square 8vo (7 1/8 x 7 1/8 in - 18.3 x 18.3 cm), decorated crepe over padded board covers, printed on hosho paper (high quality paper), pages printed one side only and black sides attached (glued) to each other along the outside edge, 50 pages with color woodblock prints with illustrations by Tosen Toda, 56 pp. For more information on this book, click here.

ca 1910, Japanese Children, Okada Matsuo, Tokyo, published by The Toyodo. Bound accordion style. 10 double page color woodblock plates.

ca 1930, Hokusai's Views of Mount Fuji, title in Japanese on front cover, c1930, 12mo (5 3/8 x 7 1/2 in - 13.8 x 19.2 cm), straw type textured covers, accordion style binding, 12 color woodblock prints on crepe paper reproducing views from Hokusai's famous Ukiyo-e series known as "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji." Each color woodblock is 10 3/4 x 7 1/2 in - 27.5 x 19.2 cm. The introduction is in English and each woodblock has Japanese and English captions. Consistent with an accordion style books, the prints are folded in the middle and affixed at the right and left edge. Stiffer paper is used between the woodblocks. The entire book folded out to make a continuous 10+ foot panorama of the woodblock prints. For more information on this book, click here.

??, The Story of Hana Sakashijiji, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokio, only cover in color, 44 pp.

??, Pocket Guide for the Land of the Rising Sun, published by Akiyama Aisaburo, Tokio, 34 pp.

 
Other Similar Books

1887, The Japanese Months, Vols 1 & 2, Fourth Edition, Okada Massao, F. Ashisuke, Tokyo 1887), large 12mo (5 1/4 x 7 1/2 in), rice paper in folded leaves, printed on one side of the folded leaves, silk ties, 19 pages of text, 9 illustrations. Not to be confused with the Kokubunsha two volume set with the same title.

1898, The "Soshi-Bushi" (Japanese Soshis' Song), Words and Illustrations by Yonejiro Suzuki, with Pianoforte Accompaniment, Tokyo, Jujiya & Co, No. 2, Sanchome, Ginza, Tokyo, Meiji 31 (1898), oblong 8vo (8 x 9 1/2 in - 20 x 24 cm), crepe paper, folded pages, silk ties, spine covered, text in English, 26 pages (13 folded pages) including the covers. The title page states: "N.B. The Illustrations to this work obtained a First-class Award at the Fine Art Exhibition (Chokokwai) held in Uyeno Park, Tokyo, September, 1897." The book starts with a two page preface which describes the "Soshi" class in Japan. This is followed by three pages of musical scores with words. These are followed by six chapters of additional stanza. Each page in the book with color woodblock illustrations. For more information on this book, click here.

1900, The Old Tale of Bubuku Chagama, crepe paper, 3 7/8 x 5 5/8 in, front cover has color woodblock illustration, internal woodblocks black and white. Printed Meiji 32 (1899). Published Meiji 33 (1900)

1900, The Story of Kintaro, published by Yachizo Matsumuro, translated by Hiroyuki Hayashi, plain paper and crepe paper versions, 4 x 6 in.

 


Similar Non-Crepe Paper Color Woodblock Print Fairy Tale Books
Nisseikwan Japanese Tales Series #1~#4

 
#1. 1887, Joseph K. Goodrich (translator) The Story of Kintoki, #1 in "The Nisseikwan Japanese Tales" series, Osaka, Nisseikwan, silk tied wrappers, color woodblocks,15 folded papes, plain paper, 30 pp. This book was printed in Meiji 20 (1887) and published in Meiji 21 (1888). To see the front cover, click here.
#2. A Short Story of Yoshitusune
#3. Deaf as a Poet
#4. Curious Logic

It is not established that #2-#4 were published.

 


Similar Non-Crepe Paper Color Woodblock Print Fairy Tale Books
T.T. Shimidzu (Professor Togokuo)

 
1888, T.T. Shimidzu (Professor Togokuo) Chu, the Tongueless Sparrow, published by Fukui Seihodo, Kyoto, small 8vo, color woodblock pictorial wraps, 10 color wood block prints, 8 of which are double page, ratta sheet tipped to last page. 30 folded pages.

 


Similar Non-Crepe Paper Woodblock Print Fairy Tale Books
Iwaya's Fairy Tales of Old Japan (Nos. 1-12)

 
Iwaya, Sazanami
Various translators:
Iwaya's Fairy Tales of Old Japan, published by Eigaku-Shimpo-Sha, Tokyo, 1903~4, plain paper, 8vo (6 x 9 in - 15 x 22.5 cm), staple bound, soft covers with color woodblocks on the outside front and back, internal woodblock illustrations (generally 12~14 per book) are black and white, front cover transliterated or translated titles in English, title page generally, but not always, with the title translated (vrs transliterated) into English, back cover in Japanese characters, Japanese and English text, various translators.

I have only examined The Tongue-Cut Sparrow. In that book, reading from back to front, there are 22 numbered pages in Japanese presenting the fairy tale. These pages are preceded by 4 pages of Japanese text which include a colophon with the date of Meiji 36 (1903) and followed by two pages of advertisements on red paper. There are no illustrations in this portion of the book.

In library holdings a book with the same title is reported as published in 1916 by the Toyoda Bunyodo. It contains 12 Japanese fairy tales and is approximately 500 pages in length. Several editions of a book with the same title were published by Hokuseido between 1930 and 1955.

The series of the 12 individual stories (books/phamplets) is listed below. The page count below is presumed to be only the English language section of the book. At least in No. 7, there are 28 additional pages in Japanese. The number of woodblock illustrations shown below included the front and back covers as 2 of the count. The numbers listed below are not actually printed in the books.

No. 1. Momotaro, The Story of the Peach Boy, translated by Hannah Riddell
No. 2. Tamanoni, The Jewel Spring, translated by Fanny B. Greene
No. 3. Cancerian-Simian War, The Revenge of the Crab Upon the Monkey, translated by Hannah Riddell
No. 4. Mirror of Matsuyama, translated by Hannah Riddell
No. 5. Old Man Flower-Blower [The Old Man Who Made Dead Trees Blossom], Fanny B. Greene
No. 6. Goblin Mountain, translated by Fanny B. Greene
No. 7. Tongue-Cut Sparrow, 1903, translated by M.E. Kirby, 36 pages in Engish and 22+ pages in Japanese, 14 woodblock illustrations, pics here
No. 8. Tawara Toda, Hidesato of the Rice Bale, translated by Hannah Riddell, 32 pp, 14 woodblock illustrations
No. 9. Story of Kachi-Kachi Yama, translated by "E.T.", 32 pp, 13 woodblock illustrations
No. 10. Old Man with the Wen, translated by M.E. Kirby
No. 11. Do-Nothing-Taro, Monogusa Taro, translated by F.B. Greene, 32 pp, 13 woodblock illustrations
No. 12. Tea-Kettle of Good Luck, translated by F.B. Greene & Miss Hisa Tateishi, 1904, 28 pp, 12 woodblock illustrations

 


Non-Crepe Paper Books in English with Woodblock Prints

 
1887-8, Walter Dening, Japan in Days of Yore, The Hakubunsha, Tokyo, a 4 part set, 12 mo, stiff illustrated wraps, string ties, plain paper, 23 double page color woodblock plates, 328 numbered pages.

Part I. Human Nature in a Variety of Aspects, 1887, 87 pages.
Part II. Wounded Pride and How it Was Healed, 1887, 71 pages.
Parts III. The Life of Miyamoto Musashi, Part I, 1888, 88 pp.
Part IV. The Life of Miyamoto Musashi, Part II, 1888, 82 pp.
Part V. The Triumph of Virtue Over Vice (advertised but publication not confirmed).
Part VI. The Life of Okubo Hikozaemon (advertised but publication not confirmed).

Each volume with color woodblock illustrations by "well-known artists." Each of the four parts are numbered separately. The object of the work is to portray the life and manners of Japan. In 1889 each volume sold for 50 cents. These books are also found with the Griffith Farran & Co. imprint on the cover and title page. For more information on this set, click here. Part IV has been confirmed in a "trade" edition which lacks the color plates. For more information on that book, click here.
Available - Complete Set of 4 Parts, Japan in Days of Yore and Complete Set of 5 Parts, The Life of Toyotomi Hideyoshi - Purchase Here
Available - Complete Set of 4 Parts - Purchase Here
Available - Part IV, Trade Edition (No Plates) - Purchase Here

 
1904-5, Walter Dening, Japan in Days of Yore, Second Edition, The Kyo Bun Kwan, Tokyo, a 4 part set, 12 mo, stiff illustrated wraps, string ties, plain paper, 23 double page color woodblock plates (same plates as first edition with some color variations), 343 pp. The page numbers continue from one part to the next.

Part I. Wounded Pride and How it Was Healed, 1904, pages 1-70.
Part II. Human Nature in a Variety of Aspects, 1904, pages 71-153.
Parts III. The Life of Miyamoto Musashi, Part I, 1905, pages 154-244.
Part IV. The Life of Miyamoto Musashi, PartII, 1905, pages 245-343.

For more information on the second edition of this four part set, click here.
Available - Parts I & IV, Second Edition - Purchase Here

 
1888-90, Walter Dening, The Life of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, a 5 part set, Tokyo, The Hakubunsha, 1888-90 (Meiji 21-23), stiff wrap covers illustrated in color, 12mo (5 x 7 1/4 in - 12.7 x 18.3 cm), string tied in Kangxi binding style, text in English and on folded pages, Japanese language colophon at the rear, approximately 4-6 double page color woodblock prints per part, a total of 27 double page and 1 single plate color woodblock prints, each part with approximately 80 text pages, pages numbered consecutively, 417 pp. The spine is not covered except for approximately 3/4 in (1.8 cm) at the top and bottom. Publisher's advertisements at the end of Parts I, II and III. For more information on this set, click here.

The set was also issued in a "trade" edition version dated 1888. In the "trade" edition books the woodblocks, which are in color in the regular editions, are black and white. The "trade" edition individual books are sometimes found bound together into a hardbound book. The hardbound book with all five Parts that I have examined had no covers for the individual parts. It started with a title page dated 1888, followed by a two page preface followed by an unnumbered page with a quote by Sir Thomas Tawele Buxton. The balance of the book was the same as the regular edition with a total of 27 double page plates and 1 single page plate. All plates are the same as in the "trade" edition except the last two plates in Part VI are entirely different. There was no colophon in this book.
Available - Complete Set of 4 Parts, Japan in Days of Yore and Complete Set of 5 Parts, The Life of Toyotomi Hideyoshi - Purchase Here
Available - Parts II & III - Purchase Here
Available - Complete Set of all 5 Parts, Trade Edition - Purchase Here


1888, Chu the Tongueless Sparrow by Professor Togokuo, title on the cover page reads: "Chu, the Tongueless Sparrow by T. T. Shimidke," published by Fukui Seihodo, Koyto, plain paper, small 8vo (5 x 7 in), numerous color woodblock illustrations, errata sheet tipped in at last page, 29 folded pages.

ca 1889, Principle Versus Interest, The Hakubunsha, 2 Vols, illustrated.

ca 1889, A History of Life, Institutions, and Manners Under the Tokugawa Shoguns, The Hakubunsha, 5 Vols. illustrated.

ca 1889, Pictures of Forty Eight Taka, The Hakubunsha.

ca 1889, Taki Kwatei, Pictures of Flowers and Birds, The Hakubunsha, The pictures "are printed from very superior woodcuts, which were exhibited at the Ueno Industrial Exhibition...."

ca 1889, Sensai Eitaku, Pictures of Children's Sports, The Hakubunsha, 13 color woodblock prints (12 of children playing) tipped to page, concertina style, 4to (19 x 27 cm), title in French, English and Japanese, preface in French and English, straw covered boards. Appears to be the same book noted below

ca 1889, Dessins Japonais. Jeux d'enfants (Japanese Paintings of Children's Sports),Tokyo, Hakubunsha, 1888, oblong 4to, fabric covered boards, 13 full page tipped to page color woodblock prints measuring 19 x 27 cm, title in English, French and Japanese, preface in English and French, concertina style.

1904, Madden, Maude Whitmore (Translator), Watanabe Tsusaburo (Illustrator), Konno Kenzaburo (Engraver), Golden Chopsticks and other Japanese Children's Songs, translated by Maude Madden, published by Takeda Manjiro printed by Sendai Printing Company, 1904 (Meiji 37), 12mo (6 1/2 x 9 in - 16.6 x 22.1 cm), stiff front and back covers with the inside covers pasted down, spine covered, 15 folded pages, plain paper, two red stab ties, 30 numbered pages. Pages 2 through 29 contain 31 Japanese children's songs. The first two songs are patriotic in nature and relate to the Russo-Japan War. Many of the songs are derived from famous Japanese fairy tales. Each song has the lyrics in Japanese and English. The accompanying woodblock prints relate to the song. A musical score is printed directly above each song. For more information on this book, click here.

1904, Ferrand, Claudius, Fables et Legendes du Japon par Claudius Ferrand, Deuxime (Second) Edition, Tous Droits Reserves, Tokio, Imprimerie de la Tsukiji Type Foundry, Paris Chez M. L'Abbe P. Ferrand, Meiji 34 (1901), small 8vo (6 x 8 3/4 in - 15 x 22.5 cm), plain paper, text in folded sheets, color woodblock plates (4) on single sheets, text in French, spine covered at head and foot for ca 1 in, ribbon ties, title page in black, frontispiece (color woodblock) with title, 155 numbered pages (78 folded pages), three internal woodblock plates on single sheets. The first page of each of the thirteen sections has a black and white woodcut decorative title. Each page of text has a black and white woodcut illustration. For more information on this book, click here. Several editions were published between 1901 and 1904.
Available - Second Edition -Purchase Here


 
This is the  Main Hasegawa Page

 


General Information Regarding T. Hasegawa Publications

 
Fukuro-Toji Bound Picture Books. The books published by Takejiro Hasegawa are in the nature of books falling under the Japanese generic descriptive title of Ehon ("e" - picture "hon" - book). They are generally bound in the traditional Japanese book binding style know as "fukuro-toji" which means "pouch binding." In this binding process sheets of paper are printed (woodblock and/or text) on only one side. They are then folded in half with the printed side out. The folded printed sheets are then stacked together along with similarly printed and folded covers and the unit secured along the spine, which is the side opposite the folds, to form the book. This technique gives you the folded pages (double leaves) which are open at the top and bottom forming the pouch ("fukuro") which the binding technique is named after. As a general rule the "fukuro-toji" books are secured/tied with (Yotsume toji bindings) in where four small holes are made along the spine edge and the sheets and covers are then bound together tightly with string or thread ties that wrap around the spine. Generally the spine is not covered except for small portions at the top and bottom. Hasegawa seldom used this form of binding. However, some of the early first editions are found secured in the traditional four hole string tie fashion. I have only seen this with the plain paper books. Most Hasegawa books were secured at the spine using two stab type holes (one at the top and one at the bottom) and secured by silk string or silk ribbon ties (Yamato toji binding). Large books consolidating several individual books are found bound with Kangxi bindings. A very few were tied in a Western style with the string binding concealed under the outside portion of the front and back covers. The paper used was a high quality wood (no rag content) based "washi," generally manufactured from mulberry. The majority of the books were crepe ("chirimen") paper. These are referred to as "chirimen-bon" (crepe paper book) in Japanese. The crepe paper process occurred between the printing process and binding processes. Hasegawa's books were uniformly of high quality in all aspects; paper, ink, execution of the art and text, printing (woodblock printing and Western type face text printing), assembly and binding.

Key Actors in the Production Process. These books involved several key actors in the production process.

  • Publisher/Editor. Kobunsha/Takejiro Hasegawa or his successor.
  • Author/Translator. Since these books were intended for markets outside of Japan, Hasegawa employed numerous prominent foreigners for this task. Many famous Westerners living in Meiji Japan were associated with Hasegawa's work. Occasionally, Hasegawa would be commissioned by others to produce their work. However, the overwhelming majority of the books were published at his initiative and under his control.
  • Artist. Hasegawa retained a group of artists to execute the illustrations for his work.
  • Text Printer. The text printing in the books was executed by a different printer from the woodblock printer.
  • Woodblock Printer. The woodblocks would be produced from the artist's work and then printed by the woodblock printer. It appears that most of the woodblock printing was done by the Komiya family.

Frederic Sharf, in his work Takejiro Hasegawa, Meiji Japan's Preeminent Publisher of Wood-Block-Illustrated Crepe-Paper Books (see here) records a remarkable amount of information on all these key individuals. In his bibliography of these books, he documents the books and, as far as the information was available, gives the names of these key people. His book also provides an in depth discussion of Hasegawa's life and business and the key authors and translators he employed. Sharf's work is an essential resource for the collector and student of these books.

Size. There are four basic sizes of the crepe paper books.

  • Very Small Size -- large 30mo (3 1/2 x 6 in - 10 x 15.2 cm). The smallest size I have seen in these books.
  • Small Size -- small 18mo (4 x 6 in - 10.3 x 15.2 cm). This is the standard size for the Fairy Tale Series books.
  • Medium Size -- large 18mo (4 3/4 x 6 1/2 in - 12 x 16.5 cm).
  • Medium Size -- 12mo (5+ x 7+ in - 13.4 x 18.8 cm) typical plain paper size.
  • Large Size -- large 12mo (6 x 7 1/2 in - 14.8 x 19 cm).
  • Very Large Size -- 8vo (7+ x 9+ in) primarily the plain paper books.
It is possible to generalize on size of crepe books versus plain paper books. The plain paper books are approximately 50% larger than the counterpart version on crepe paper. As a general rule the plain paper books measure 12.3+ x 18+ cm while the same book in crepe paper measures 9.8+ x 15+ cm. Since the crepe books were first completed in a plain paper format and the paper then creped, perhaps the difference is shrinkage during that process.

Crepe/Plain Paper. In the second edition of Oyuchasan, published in 1893, Hasegawa advertised The Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Nos. 1-20 in "Ordinary Paper & Crepe Paper." On this matter, Sharf notes that the Maruzen company in Tokyo sold Hasegawa/Kobunsha books and until 1893 all listed in company catalogues were on plain paper. The 25 numbers of the First Japanese Fairy Tale Series, as well as No 1 & 2 of the Second Series, were apparently all sold in plain paper versions. They were also sold in crepe paper versions.

Bindings. Discussed and illustrated below.

Wraparound Cases (Chitsu). A very few of the Hasegawa books were sold with tradational Japanese wraparound cases (bone/ivory clasps) although they are seldom seen with material currently being offered commercially. When the books are enclosed in these hinged cases, the top and bottom of the case are open. The following have been confirmed with folding cases:

  • Dichtergusse Aus Dem Osten, Japanishce Dichtungen
  • Poetical Greetings from the Far East
  • White Aster
  • Japanische Dichtungen, Weissaster
  • Sword and Blossom Poems, 3 volumes (padded folding cover with title and plain with no lettering).
  • Japanische Dramen: Terakoya u. Asagao
  • Lafcadio Hearn's five book Japanese Fairy Tale sets.

Colophons (Japanese Language). The books contain Japanese language colophons, generally at the rear. These colophons usually state:

  • Date Printed
  • Date Published
  • Author/translator
  • Editor and Publisher - Takejiro Hasegawa with the Tokyo Address
  • Woodblock Printer and Address
  • Text Printer and Address.

They also generally state in English and/or Japanese - "Copyright Reserved" / "All Rights Registered and Reserved." An example of a colophon with English translations annotated is here. A word of caution is necessary regarding colophons in these books. It was not unusual for a later reprint of a book to contain the same colophon found in the earlier edition. Dating these books can be a complicated undertaking and that is discussed below.

Distributor/Agent Imprints.

Brentano's, New York
Ernst Bojesens, Kunst Frolag Kjobenhavn (Copenhaven - Kobenhavn)
Breitkopf & Hartel, Leipzig, Brussells, London, & New York
Griffith, Farran & Co., London and Sydney, N.S.W.
C.F. Amelang's Verlag, Leipzig
Messrs. Essex & Cammeyer, United Kingdom (Oyuchasan, plain paper version)
First Japanese Mfg and Trading Co., New York City (Silly Jelly Fish, plain paper version)
H. Honig, Netherlands (Dutch language books)
Kelly and Walsh, Yokohama
Maruzen, Tokyo
Macrae-Smith, Philadelphia (1931 Lafcadio Hearn's translated set of 5)
Martin Hopkinson, Ltd, London (limited quantities generally 200-500)
Open Court Publishing, Chicago
Sampson Low, Marston & Company (Rat's Plaint, Children's Japan, Niponese Rhymes & Princess Splendor)
Shepherds, London
Simkin Marshall Co, London
Simkin Marshall, Hamilton, Kent Co., London
Ticknor & Co., Boston (Aino Fairy Tales No. 1 and No. 2)
Trubner & Co., London (Perhaps Aino Fairy Tales)
Wentzel Hagelstam Forlag, Helsingfors (Helsinki), Swedish language books
 
Griffith, Farran & Co. Imprint Books. The first 16 Fairy Tales were printed by Kobunsha with the Griffith, Farran & Company imprint. The special printings for Griffith, Farran & Company were published ca 1888. These books are generally found bound into four volumes but sometimes unbound and in the original state. Regarding the Hasegawa - Griffith, Farran & Co. relationship, Sharf notes:

Early on in his career, he had prepared a special edition of his crepe-paper fairy tale series for the venerable English publisher Griffith, Farran & Company. With offices in London and Sydney, and with a solid reputation for their children's books, the firm was an important client for Hasegawa in the 1880's. The books that Griffith, Farran contracted with Hasegawa to produce were more in the Western vein, with sewn and glued spines, and with Griffith, Farran identification on the cover. (Sharf at page 22, underlining is mine)

From a binding perspective the major distinction in these special production books is that they are not bound by stab ties or external string ties. Additional information on several of these books is found here.

Different Language Versions. The Fairy Tale books were printed several languages.

  • Danish - "Japanesiske Eventyr" - Three books, Krigen Mellem Aberne og Krabberne (I), Spurven der mistede sin Tunge (II) and Brendehuggeren og Troldene (III), Japanesiske Eventyr I-III, translated by Agnes Berner, distributed by Ernst Bojesens, Kunstforlag, Coppenhagen, bearing the Kobunsha, Tokyo imprint . The same three titles were translated into Swedish (see below).
  • Dutch - Two books; Shitakiri Suzume, plain paper, c1886 and De Musch Met De Geknipte Tong), plain paper, 18.1 cm x 12.3cm, 10 double pages, 1892. A Dutch language calendar has also been reported (Almanak voor 1903).
  • French - "Les Contes du Vieux Japon" (Nos. 1~21, same books/numbers as in English versions). An early edition (Battle of the Monkey and the Crab) is reported on plain paper in medium size (12.5 x 18 cm) with the 2 Minami Saegi-cho address. In this book the covers are in color but the internal woodblocks are black and white. This type of book would date between 1885 and 1889. In an advertisement published in 1906, Hasegawa offered the 20 volume set "..une boite en carton" for $6.00.
  • German - "Japanische Marchen" First Series: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 16, 21, 21 Second Edition. Second Series: 2 & 3. For more information on the German translations, click here. Japanische Marchen, Momotaro, was republished in 1942. To see the covers and book list in this book, click here. In an advertisement published in 1906, Hasegawa offered volumes 1-5 "..in Carton" for $1.25.
  • Portuguese - "Contos do Velho Japano de Carangueijo" (Nos. 1~8).
  • Spanish - Two series. First series, "Cuentos del Japon Viejo (Nos. 1~10)." Second series Leyendas y Narraciones Japonesas (Nos. 1~10)." For more information on this set click here. Several Spanish language calendars have been reported.
  • Swedish - "Japanesiski Sagor" - were translated by Konni Zilliacus who spent the period from 1894-6 in Japan. During this time he collaborated with T. Hasegawa to translate Fairy Tales No. 1 (Momotaro), No. 2 (Spariven med den Klippta Tungan) and No. 7 (Gubben och Trollen) into the Swedish language. These were printed in Tokyo and carried the Wentzel Hagelstam, Forlag, Helsingfors, imprint in addition to "T. Hasegawa's Tryckeri" (10 Hiyoshi-cho, Tokyo). To see the front covers of these books, click here. The same three titles were translated into Danish (see above).
  • Italian and Russian (one book, The Wonderful Tea Kettle).
  • Polish. It appears that a series in Polish was proposed but never published.

Hasegawa Output Over the Years (1885~1930). I have not seen a definitive listing of all the books and calendars produced by The Kobunsha and T. Hasegawa over the years. However, a review of this material that I have seen indicates more than 250 different and distinctive books or calendars were produced over this period. One advanced collector has placed the total at more than 700. This includes crepe and plain paper books of the same title as well as versions of the books in different languages as distinctive publications. It does not include different printing of the same item.

Quantities Produced. I have not found a record of the output of the various Hasegawa publications. Sharf notes that the books were "...produced in quantities of either five hundred or one thousand copies per title...." (Sharf at page 11). I am aware of only one book where the quantity printed is actually stated. That is Japanese Dramen: Terakoya u. Asagao. At least seven editions of the book were produced with a quantity of 1,000 copies per edition. In this book the quantity is stated on the folding case, on the title page and in the colophon.

Takejiro Hasegawa in Japanese. In the colophon of these books you often see Hasegawa's name in this manner:

Hasegawa

 
 

 
Takejiro

 
 

 

Addresses in Japanese (all in Tokyo). A listing of addresses and dates is provided in the Sharf book at Appendix Three.

The Kobunsha

  • 2 Minami Saegi-Cho, Kyobashi-ku
    Kobunsha sometimes lists as "No. 2 Minami, Sayegicho" in English

    (reading from right to left)

    (reading from top to bottom)

  • 3 Maruya-cho, Kyobashi-ku

    (reading from right to left and top to bottom -
    in use only a very short period of time)

Hasegawa

  • 10 Hiyoshi-cho, Kyobashi-ku
      

  • 20 Honzaimoko-cho, Nichome, Nihonbashi-ku

    (in use only a short period of time)

  • 38 Honmura-cho, Yotsuya-ku
    Hasegawa lists as "38 Yotsuya, Honmura" in English
     

  • 17 Kami Negishi-cho, Shitaya-ku

    The name "Hasegawa Publishing Company"
    is often associated with this address

 
First Editions, Japanese Fairy Tales 1-16 (English)

Michael Hollander, in his List of these book, states the following regarding the English language Japanese Fairy tale books:

A true first edition set of the Fairy Tale series will consist of the first twelve titles on plain paper, with titles in phonetic Japanese, and the imprint Kobunsha. The titles numbered 13-20 on creped paper with the titles in English and the imprint of Kobunsha and the titles numbered 21-23 on creped paper and with the imprint Hasegawa & Co., complete a first edition set. (Hollander, at page 339)

Unfortunately, it is not as simple as this. I find it interesting that Sharf does not deal with the matter of the various editions in his comprehensive book on T. Hasegawa aside from presenting printing and publication dates. Since earlier dates were often repeated verbatim in later editions, the dates you find are not absolutely determinative as to whether a book is a first edition.

I will present my tentative observations/conclusions regarding first editions below. I believe that the plain paper books predated the crepe paper books for the first 20 English Japanese Fairy Tale Series books.


Plain Paper, First Editions
Cover Title Types A, A1, A2, B & B1

First Editions and Transliterated Title Versus Translated Title, Nos. 1-12. The first editions of the first 12 English language Japanese Fairy Tale Series have the title spelled phonetically in English (transliterated). The title appears translated into English on the first page of the text. In addition, these books are plain paper and have the Kobunsha imprint. Some of these books are found with the title of "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. __" in addition to the transliterated title. Currently, my research indicates that starting with 1886 (No. 7) the Japanese Fairy Tale series number was included on the cover along with the title. It also appears that starting with 1887 (No 13) use of the transliterated title was discontinued in favor of the translated title.

In a comment somewhat related to this matter, Frederic A. Sharf states:

The first printed listing of Kobunsha products (seen by the author) was issued in December of 1886, and it contained the first twelve volumes of the Japanese Fairy Tale Series. Each volume was identified with the cover title in Japanese and the English equivalent on the inside first page. The next listing was issued February 1887 with fourteen volumes, but at this point all the cover titles were in English, an obvious concession to the need to develop an export market. (Sharf at page 12)

Regarding paper type (plain and crepe), Sharf notes that the Maruzen firm first listed the Hasegawa books in it's 1890 catalogue and at that time they were all plain paper versions (Sharf at page 17). He then observes that in an 1893 Maruzen catalogue, they were listed in crepe and plain paper. In a later edition of Oyuchasan, published in January of 1893, Hasegawa advertised the Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Nos. 1-20 in "Ordinary Paper & Crepe Paper." It appears very likely that all the Fairy Tale books between Nos. 1 and 20 (1885~1892) were first printed on plain paper and that the crepe paper versions followed later and were available as early as 1893. It certainly does appear that in the period around 1890, as the Kobunsha imprint was being discontinued and the T. Hasegawa imprint was being established, there was a definite shift from the production of plain paper books to creped paper books.

8 Thus far I have confirmed plain paper versions of Nos. 1~18 (1885-9). I am of the opinion that the plain paper versions of these books were the first editions and probably the same is the case for Nos. 19-20 (1891~92).

With regard to plain paper versions of Nos. 1~18, below are the major types of titles I have identified.

 
Type A. Transliterated Titles:

 
Type A1. Transliterated Titles with "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. __":

 

Type A2. Transliterated Titles only on Front Cover - Transliterated
Title & "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. __" inside Front Cover:

 

Type B. Translated Titles with "Japanese Fairy Tale Series. No. __"

 
Type B1. Translated Title without "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. __"

(Seldom seen Variation)

 
The plain paper books with type A1, B & B1 titles are sometimes called "Saihan" (second printing). They may have a slightly different color scheme on the front cover. Despite the slightly different covers, the colophons and contents are the same.

The plain paper books measure approximately 4 3/4~5 x 7 in (12.1~12.8 x 17.7~18.6 cm).

I am of the opinion that it is accurate to call all the plain paper versions of Nos. 1-12 "First Editions." Some may be later printings but it appears accurate to call them all first editions despite minor variations in titles.

My review of these books leads me to the following tentative conclusions.

    Transliterated Titles on the Front Cover:

  • Type A (transliterated) titles appear (believed used only on Nos. 1-6) to be the earliest type and first editions, first printings. Use confirmed on Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6 thus far.

  • Type A1 (transliterated and with Fairy Tale no.) titles of Nos. 1-6 are believed to be second printings of the first edition. Use confirmed on Nos. 3 (2nd ed) & 4 thus far.

  • Type A1 titles of Nos. 7-12 are believed to be the first printing of the first edition. Use confirmed on Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 & 17 thus far. Fairy Tale No. 17 (Schippeitaro) was not issued with a different or translated title.

  • Type A2 titles. Use confirmed on No. 1 (2nd edition) and No. 6 thus far.

  • Translated Titles on the Front Cover:

  • Type B (translated and with Fairy Tale No.) titles start to appear consistently with Nos 13. Use has been confirmed on Nos. 2 (2nd ed), 3 (2nd ed) 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 23, 24, 25, Second Series, No. 1 and the Fountain of Youth thus far. I believe it is very likely that all numbers between 1-12 have a later (first edition but later printing) plain paper printing using the Type B title cover. Further, I believe that starting with No. 13, only the Type B cover title was used.

  • Type B1 variant (translated but without Fairy Tale no.) has only been seen on Nos. 5 and 7 and those book carried "Japanese Fairy Tales, No. 5/ 7" internally with the colophon.

 
Plain Paper Versions with Brown (not illustrated) Outer Covers. The books discussed above all have illustrated front and back covers. A variant of these books has been recorded with plain brown covers bound in Japanese style with thin string ties. These books have a white paste on label with a decorative border which reads "Japanese Fairy Tales" at the top. Below that is the name of the tale in Japanese and translated into English. Below that is "Published by Kobunsha" and the No 2. Minami Tokyo address. On the right and left are vertical columns of Japanese text. The left hand columns give the printing and publication dates and all were printed and published in Meiji 18 (1885). The dates given correspond to the dates found on the plain paper first editions with color illustrated covers. The labels do not have a fairy tale number and none is stated internally. Books in this format are reported for "Momotaro"(No. 1), "Shita Kiri" Suzume (No. 2), "Saru Kani Kassen" (No 3), "Hana Saki Jiji" (No. 4), "KachiKachi Yama" (No. 5) and "Nedzumi no Yome-ire" (No. 6). All illustrations in these books are in black and white. Sharf, referring to these books, calls them the "first Kobunsha" books and notes they were intended for the Japanese educational market (Sharf at page 11).

Plain Paper Versions of Nos. 13-20. These numbers are probably all found in plain paper versions. I have confirmed plain paper versions of Nos 13~16 (Wooden Bowl) and 17 and 18. The plain paper versions I have seen of these are only found with translated titles which include "Japanese Fairy Tale Series No. __." (type B). The crepe paper versions carry the same type titles. Additionally Nos. 19~20 are reported in plain paper but I have not examined a copy. In a later edition of Oyuchasan, published in January of 1893, Hasegawa advertised the Japanese Fairy Tale Series, Nos. 1-20 in "Ordinary Paper & Crepe Paper." It is unclear whether the plain paper versions are first editions or whether they were published simultaneously with the crepe paper versions. However, it does appear logical that the plain paper versions were published and distributed before the crepe paper versions. The plain paper versions are uniformly larger than the crepe paper ones, measuring 17.9~18.5 x 12.1~12.5 cm.

Determining Date of Printing & Publication. As with most books, values generally vary on a particular item based upon when it was printed and published. The earlier books often command a premium over later printings. Unfortunately, often the books do not state the date of printing or edition. An additional complicating factor is the fact that dates in the Japanese colophons are often not helpful because later editions would sometimes carry colophons from earlier versions (more on this in the next paragraph). However, many of the T. Hasegawa publications give the Hasegawa address. A listing of addresses and dates is provided in the Sharf book. With the address/dates, you can get a helpful "guestimate" of when a particular books was produced. Another means of establishing the date of printing is review of the advertising list found at the back of many of the books. If the date of the last book listed/advertised is known, then the approximate date of printing of the book in hand can be bracketed. The fact that a book carries the Kobunsha (rather than Hasegawa) imprint can not be considered conclusive evidence it is an early printing (1890 and earlier). Reprints are found that carry that carry the Kobunsha imprint even after it was discontinued in favor of the Hasegawa imprint.

Reprints. To complicate dating books, one must consider the matter of reprints produced by Hasegawa. It is evident that books were reprinted at later dates but the original colophons were not changed, at least the dates. Perhaps the Japanese in the colophon denotes it as a reprint but I have been unable to confirm that. I have personally reviewed two series of books (No 1~15, first series, small 18mo, crepe) which were originally published under the Kobunsha imprint in the period from 1885~1887. The colophons in these books reflect the original printing and publication dates. However, the imprint (in Japanese in one series [c1898] and English in the other series [c1911]) is Takejiro Hasegawa, not Kobunsha. Based upon the address listed for Hasegawa in the books, and to some degree the advertising, it is very clear these are reprints. Books (Nos. 1-20) printed on plain paper are most likely first editions and not later reprints. However, they might represent different printings (first or second printings) of a first edition.

Copyright Notices. My review of Hasegawa/Kobunsha works indicates that copyright notices were not added to the books until the late-1890s. For the English language Japanese Fairy Tales No. 1-20, the presence of a copyright notice or "All Rights Reserved" notice is a strong indication that the book is a reprint or later edition. Below are examples of the Hasegawa copyright notice.

   

Book Binding Techniques. The vast majority of books marketed by T. Hasegawa were bound in traditional Japanese sewn binding techinques. These binding types (Yotsume toji, Kangxi and Yamato toji) are detailed below. Of these binding types, the vast majority of the books were bound in the Yamato toji style. Under special contract with Griffith, Farran & Co., the first 16 books of the fairy tale series were bound in a western type style without stab ties or external string ties. A few other non-fairy tale books were also bound in this manner.

 
Yotsume toji Binding.   The first editions (individual books) were sometimes bound with very flimsy string ties.

In typical Japanese style, the string/thread ties run down the spine side vertically and are secured in four places by loops which pass around the spine and through small holes punched through the book block. The string ties are very flimsy and are often missing, broken or very loose. Frankly, the binding is so weak that it seems to me that it was anticipated that the books bound in this manner would subsequently be bound into book form using a more substantial method of book binding and not publicly marketed. This style of Japanese book binding is know as Yotsume toji binding.  

 
Kangxi Binding. The consolidated set volumes of first edition books with thick paper illustrated covers (Volume I, Volume II and Volume III) are bound with sturdy double string ties. I have not seen individual books bound in this manner, only larger books which are a consolidation of several individual books.

This is known as Kangxi binding and is a traditional and sturdy Chinese and Japanese book binding technique. For an excellent illustrated step by step discussion of this binding process, click here. This Kangxi binding is much more elaborate than that used on the individual books.

 
Yamato toji Binding (Two and Four Hole Types).   The vast majority of the Hasegawa books are bound at two points with ribbon/cord ties. This is known as the Yamato toji style of Japanese book binding. It is seen with double holes at each point and sometimes four holes at each point. When four holes are used the binding crossed in an "X" pattern on the front and back. In these books the spine is sometimes covered with very thin paper.

Double stab hole Yamato toji binding.

Four stab hole Yamato toji binding (often used on thicker books).

 
Below is an example of a rather unique binding, at least for Hasegawa books. It is tied at the side. I have only seen this style of binding used on the Aino Fairy Tales series. It is a variant of the Yamato toji style but the ties are wraped around the edge and tied off along the edge.

       

 

Condition. Evaluating the condition of these books requires consideration of several factors. Some are peculiar to the form of binding used and others are of general applicability to all books. For the folded page bound books, I discuss the factors I consider most important here.

 


 
Reference/Resource Material.  
Sharf, Frederic A.:
Takejiro Hasegawa: Meiji Japan's Preeminent Publisher of Wood-Block-Illustrated Crepe-Paper Books, Salem, 1994, Peabody Essex Museum Collections, red pictorial wrappers, large 8vo (8 1/2 x 11 in), one black and white plate (photograph of T. Hasegawa) and 26 black & white text illustrations, 77 pp. Comprehensive resource on the Hasegawa crepe paper books. Well researched and documented review of T. Hasegawa's life and publishing efforts. The text follows Hasegawa's life as a publisher in a chronological order. This is followed by a section with detailed information on the various Westerners who worked with Hasegawa in the publishing enterprise (pages 32-58). These include Lieutenant F.M. Bostwick, Charles and Susan Bowles, Mae St. John Bramhall, Julia D. Carrothers, Paul Carus, Basil Hall Chamberlain, Benjamin Chappell, Joseph Dautremer, Karl Adolph Florenz, Adolph Groth, Lafcadio Hearn, Dr. James Curtis Hepburn, Mrs. Thomas H. (Kate) James, Mary G. Kimura, Shotaro Kimura, Alica Helen Little, Archibald J. Little, Arthur Lloyd, Edward Rothesay Miller, Emily Patton, Charlotte M.A. Peake, Mrs. W.H. Smith, David Thompson, Mary E. Unger and Captain P.G. Van Schermbeek. The book has a "Selected Biography" (pages 60-65) which provides detailed information on the various Japanese Fairy Tale Series books and other English language illustrated books. This information is general in terms - title, author or translator, artist, printing date, publication date, publisher (with address), woodblock printer and text printer when known. Also contains a chronological listing Hasegawa addresses. The first address is 1885 and the last is 1911 to an unstated date. To see the front cover, click here. These addresses are very helpful in determining the approximate date of printing. This book was also published in the Peabody Essex Museum Collections, Volume 130, Number 4, October, 1994.
~~ Available - Purchase Here ~~

 
Cortazzi, Sir Hugh:
Images of Japan 1885-1912: Scenes, Tales and Flowers, Norwich, UK, Hugh Cortazzi and Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, 2011, large 12mo (5 3/4 x 8 1/4 in - 14.7 x 21 cm), stiff illustrated wraps, numerous color illustrations, bibliography (page 129), endnotes (pages 130-38) and index (pages 139-40), 140 pp. Sir Cortazzi's book is a comprehensive overview of the various color illustrated books produced in the second half of Meiji era Japan and targeted to the foreign market. The book is organized into thirteen categories (Japanese fairy tales, children, flowers, scenery and customs, calendars, satirical books, poetry, etc). Sir Cortazzi discusses the color woodblock books (crepe and plain paper) published by Takejiro Hasegawa. Akiyama Aizaburo and Jujiya and the color (chromo-collotype and hand tinted collotype) plate books published by K. Ogawa, T. Takagi and K. Tamamura. For most books discussed you find comments on the publisher, artist, author and translator as well as extensive color reproduced illustrations. The illustrations are accompanied by detailed descriptive commentary. To see a picture of the covers, click here. ISBN 978-0-9545921-3-4.
~~ Available - Purchase Here ~~

 

Byrne, Alexander:
Chirimen-bon or Crepe Paper Books, published in Daruma, Japanese Art & Antiques Magazine, Issue 47, Vol. 12, No. 3, Summer 2005, Japan, 8vo, illustrated stiff wraps, 58 pp. The article on Japanese crepe paper books covers pages 12 to 27. It is illustrated with 47 color illustrations. An informative and finely illustrated discussion of the Japanese Chirimen books. The Takejiro Hasegawa books are discussed with many illustrations. Hasegawa calendars (book type and hanging) are also noted. Additionally, similar crepe paper books by Akiyama Aisaburo, Hasegawa Sonokichi, SLG (Sidney L. Gulick) and S. Takashima/K. Ogawa are discussed. An important reference work for the collector of these books. To see the cover of this issue, click here.
~~ Available - Purchase Here ~~

 

Ishizawa Saeko:
Chirimen-bon no Subete: Meiji Obun Sashie-bon, Tokyo, 2005, 8vo (6 1/4 x 8 1/2 in), red cloth with illustrated slip cover, Japanese language, 332 pp. Roughly, the title translates "Everything about crepe paper books: Meiji era illustrated books." Perhaps the most comprehensive discussion of the illustrated crepe paper books of the Meiji era published. While the text is in Japanese, book titles and Western author's names are in Western languages. The book reads in the Japanese format from the back to the front. The front of the book has a 8 pages of color illustration of the crepe paper books. Most books have one or several black and white illustrations in the text discussion. The focus, as one would expect, is the T. Hasegawa/Kobunsha books (in all languages). Pages 243-332 contain information on Fairy Tale books produced by non-Japanese. Here you find books by A.B. Mitford, F.A. Junker von Langegg, William Elliot Griffis, H. Riddell ("Iwaya's Fairy Tales of Old Japan"), Fanny B. Greene and others. At the back, right before the colophon, are 44 pages (i-xliv) of charts and data. There include an extensive series of tables on the Hasegawa/Kobunsha Japanese Fairy Tale series. The book was obviously not intended for the person unable to read Japanese. However, much valuable information can be garnered from the illustrations, the scattered Western language titles and author's names and the tables. Many little known books are described and pictured in addition to the standard fare of Hasegawa published crepe paper book. To see the dust jacket, click here. ISBN: 4-8382-3128-9.
~~ Available - Purchase Here ~~
 

No Author Stated:
Takejiro Hasegawa and the History of the Crepe Paper Book, Japan (Chiba), 2001, The University of the Air (now Hoso Daigaku, Open University of Japan), except for book titles and English language names, text in Japanese only, large 8vo (8 1/4 x 11 3/4 in), stiff illustrated wraps, numerous text illustrations in color, 10 page table of Kobunsha/Hasegawa books at the rear, 33 pp. The front cover has a fold out flap. On the inside of the flap a plain paper version of Momotaro is shown. On the inside of the front cover (across from the inside of the fold out flap, a crepe textured paper illustration of Momotaro is tipped in. The first section of the book covers the Japanese Fairy Tales 1-21. Japanese Fairy Tale 1 (Momotaro) has nine different illustrations of covers of the book from plain paper to crepe paper and English to other language editions. The next section cover the Aino Tale series and pictures all three books. Next is a section on the five books that were translated by Lafcadio Hearn. This is followed by a section on "Movables, Calendars & Others." The movable books are those with a movable flap or fold out section (3 books illustrated). The Calendars illustrated include the very small ones, the book format calendars and odd shaped ones. Next is a brief illustrated discussion on the making of crepe (chirimen) paper. The book concludes with a detailed 10 page listing of Kobunsha/Hasegawa publications. There are a total of 204 numbered items listed with detailed information which generally includes the title (in English), the size (stated in mm), the printing and publication date, the translator and more. To see the front cover, click here. No ISBN.

   

Hollander, Michael S.:
ABMR
Hollander, Michael:
Antiquarian Book Monthly Review (ABMR) , Vol IX, No. 9, Issue 101, Oxford, UK, 1982, September issue, 8vo, paper wraps, pages 331~364. Contains an article by Michael Hollander titled List of Books Published by T. Hasegawa, Tokyo at pages 338~441. This is the earliest comprehensive English language listing of T. Hasegawa books that I have found. The author focuses on the Fairy Tale series but covers other books also and gives a wealth of information which includes title, number of pages and size. Not all these details are provided for each book however. To see the front cover, click here.
 

Perkins, Percival D.
Perkins, Ione
Ichikawa, Sanki (introduction):
Lafcadio Hearn a Biography of His Writings, Boston and New York, Houghton Mifflin Company, printed in Japan by the Kenkyosha Printing Company, Tokyo, gray cloth, paste on labels on front board and spine, Tokyo, 1934, 8vo, collotype frontispiece reproducing Hearn's message to the Japanese people, 444 pp. Discusses all 5 books written by Hearn and published by T. Hasegawa - The Boy Who Drew Cats (1st Series, #23), The Old Woman Who Lost Her Dumpling (1st Series, #24), Chin Chin Kobakama (1st Series, #25), The Fountain of Youth and The Goblin Spider (2nd Series, #1).
 

Chamberlain, Basil Hall
Tylor, Edward B. (introduction):
Aino Folk-Tales (Folk-Lore Society, XXII), London, privately printed for the Folk-Lore Society, 1888, prefatory remarks dated July 20, 1887, 8vo, paper wraps, vii, 57 pp. This is a compilation of 54 different Aino folk tales gathered by Chamberlain primarily during a stay in Hokkaido among the Aino in Summer of 1886 and during two earlier visits. While I have seen this publication described with cloth covered boards, I believe that it was bound privately or a modern reprint. I believe that the publication was originally issued by the Folk-Lore Society as a stand-alone soft-cover book. More information on this book is here.

This work was prepared at the same time that Chamberlain's Aino Fairy Tales No. 1 and No. 2 were being prepared for publication by The Kobunsha/T. Hasegawa. Variants of the three of the folk tales in Chamberlain's 1888 book are found in the T. Hasegawa color woodblock illustrated books. Information on Basil Hall Chamberlain's Aino-Fairy Tales published by Takejiro Hasegawa is here.

 
Riccardo, Franci:
Takejiro Hasegawa e le fiabe giapponesi del Museo Stibbert (Takejiro Hasegawa and the Japanese Fairy Tales Collection of the Stibbert Museum), Livorno, Italy, Sillabe, October 2008, square 8vo (9 1/2 x 8 3/4 in - 24 x 22 cm), stiff wraps, text in Italian and English, 300 illustrations, 204 pp. A discussion of T. Hasegawa's work and the collection of his material in the Stibbert Museum. The book is primarily a page by page presentation of the first thirteen plain paper English language Japanese Fairy Tale books published by T. Hasegawa. It contains the seldom seen plain paper version of "Kobutoro" (Japanese Fairy Tale No. 7). Each of the thirteen books is preceded by a page of comments about the book in Italian and English. To see the front cover, click here. ISBN: 978-88-8347-478-1.
~~ Available - Purchase Here ~~

 
A 2004 National Diet Library Newsletter (No 135) discusses the "Chirimen-bon: books made of Chirimen Paper (crepe paper)" with a focus on the T. Hasegawa books. That newsletter (No 135, February 2004) can be found here. It is interesting to note that the newsletter has the following rationale for the incomplete collection of these books in the Diet Library:

The incompleteness of the collection may be attributed to the way in which the former Imperial Library (one of the predecessors of the NDL) categorized its acquisitions. Chirimen books in minor languages or cheap editions might have been categorized as materials not worth long-term preservation. There is also a possibility that part of collections was lost in the Great Kanto Earthquake.

 
Various:
Anthony's Photographic Bulletin, Volume XXI, New York, E. & H. T. Anthony & Co., 1890, March issue, 8vo, contains a reproduction of a formally posed photograph of Takejiro Hasegawa.

 
Japanese Copyright Law. See National Diet Library Newsletter (No. 134, December 2003 ). Information can be found here. The Newsletter summarizes the Japanese copyright law as follows:

Copyright continues to exist until the end of a period of fifty years following the death of the author (Article 51). As for the duration of copyright, there are some exceptions for anonymous and pseudonymous works, the works of a legal person or other corporate body, and foreign authors. However, the basic assumption on general works is that from fifty-one years after the death of the author, the work is free from the copyright.

 


If you are aware of books with illustrations produced by Takejiro Hasegawa which are not listed above, your comments would be greatly appreciated. In addition, corrections/additions/comments regarding the above listing are welcome.

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