Manners and Customs of the Japanese
Philipp Von Siebold, et al, 1842

Illustrated Title Page

Von Siebold, Philipp and other Dutch Writers:
Manners and Customs of the Japanese, in the Nineteenth Century: From the Accounts of Recent Dutch Residents of Japan, and from the German Work of Dr. Ph. Fr. Von Siebold, New York, Harper and Brothers, 1842 (©1841) (2nd US edition), 18mo (4 1/4 x 6 1/4 in - 10.5 x 15.7 cm), illustrated title page, 298 pp. Perhaps the first comprehensive record of Japan in the 19th century written by an outsider. The work is primarily a translation of Von Siebold's writings on Japan. Philipp Von Siebold, a Dutch (German/Bavarian by birth) physician, was the company physician for Dutch trading settlement in Deshima beginning in August of 1823. In October of 1829, Von Siebold was banished from Japan forever. He was suspected by the Japanese of spying for the Russians. Von Siebold's presence in Japan gave him unique insight into the people and culture. Despite his expertise, Perry rejected his efforts to join the Expedition to Japan.

Chapters (Total of 15)
Listing within [ ] are representative and not all within that chapter.

  1. Chapter 1 Bay of Nagasaki Intercourse of the Dutch with Japan. - Voyage. - Shipwrecked Japanese. - Illegality and danger of their quitting their sinking vessel. - Approach to Kiusiu [Kyushu]. - Appearance of their country. - Bay of Nagasaki. - Japanese precautions prior to a ship entering the bay - and on land. - Smuggling. - Exclusion of a President's wife. - Reasons. - Personal appearance of the Japanese. - Dress. - Ensigns of rank. - Uses of the fan.

  2. Chapter 2 Life at Dezima Factitious island. - Factory. - Confinement of the Dutch therein. - Restrictions upon their intercourse with natives - With servants. - Female servants. - Children by Japanese women. - Restrictions upon their dealings. - Management of the trade. - Police. - Interpreters. - Intercourse with men in office. - Trampling upon the picture of our Saviour. - Toleration and subsequent persecution of Christianity. - Japanese martyrs. - Anecdote of a wrecked Portuguese brig. - Intercourse of subordinate dignitaries. - Audiences of the Governor of Nagasaki - Dutch Sepulchres.

  3. Chapter 3 Nagasaki and Its Environs Excursions permitted. - Drawbacks. - Town of Nagasaki. - Houses. - Gardens. - Fire-proof Store-rooms. - Scenery. - Temples. - Tea-houses. - Education and extraordinary estimation of courtezans. - Visits. - Religious festivals. - Japanese Demons. - Hunting procession. - New Volcano.

  4. Chapter 4 Periodical Journey to Yedo Periods of the Yedo journeys. - Preliminary forms. - Numbers of the party. - Honours paid to the Dutch President. - Array of the party. - Travelling arrangements. - Sights upon the journey. - Ikko-seu [sen] Temple. - Camphor tree. - Mineral and hot springs. - Prince of Tsikuzen's apartment. - Coal mine. - Mode of obtaining a fair wind. - Examination at Aray. - River Oyegawa. - Mountain Foesi [Fuji]. - Examination at Fakone. - Anecdote. - Arrival.

  5. Chapter 5 Stay at Yedo Yedo. - Palace. - Visitors. - Physicians and astronomers. - Grandees and ladies. - Silkmercer. - Conflagration. - Anecdote respecting new lodgings. - Audience of the Ziogoon. - Ceremonious visits. - Presents. - Forms in Kaempfer's time. - Japanese fancy for Dutch names. Banquet.

  6. Chapter 6 Return to Dezima Leave-taking at Yedo. - Miyako. - The Mikado. - His extraordinary dignity. - Honours paid him. - His abdication or death. - His wives. - His reception of, and visit to the Ziogoon at Miyako. - Learning of the Dairi. - Ohosaka. - Amusements. - Theatre. - Plays. - Actors. - Strange intermingling of different plays. - Arrival. - Dutch distress during the interruption of intercourse with Jave. - Japanese endeavours to relieve it. - Success and failure.

  7. Chapter 7 Social and Domestic Life Condition of women. - Customs preceding and accompanying Birth. - Naming the baby. - Treatment of children. - Education. - Abdomen ripping. - Evil eye. - Change of name. - Marriage. - Courtship. - Marriage-brokers. - Presents. - Wedding. - Abdication of heads of families. - Duties of politeness. - Correspondence. - Presents. - Visits. - Banquets. - Tea-drinking. - Amusements. - Music. - Dancing. - Games. - Forfeits. - Intoxication. - Rural and water parties. - Retailers of gossip, teachers of good manners. - Nayboen or underhand death. - Ceremonies in the house of death. - Obsequies. - Mourning.

  8. Chapter 8 Political State of Japan Government. - Peculiarity of Japanese despotism. - Feudal tenures. - Mikado. - Ziogoon. - Council of State. - Its constitution and power. - Governor of the Empire. - Consequence of a difference of opinion between the Ziogoon and the Council. - Vassal princes. - Ministers forced upon them. - Annoyances to which they are subjected. - Modes of impoverishment. - Lordships. - Imperial governments. - Official establishment at Nagasaki. -Municipal authorities. - Mutual espial. - Its effects. - Classification of the Japanese. - Princes. - Nobles. - Priests. - Military tenants. - Inferior officials and medical profession. - Superior traders. - Inferior traders, artisans and artists. - Peasantry. - Degradation of dealers in leather. - Administration of justice. - Executions. - Torture. - Prisons.

  9. Chapter 9 Anecdotes Illustrative of the Character and Manners of the Japanese The Phaeton, Captain Pellew, enters Nagasaki Bay. - Transactions there. - Japanese governor's plan. - Neglect of duty discovered. - The Phaeton's departure. - Disastrous results. - Siebold's adventures. - Tchouya's conspiracy. - Arrests. - His wife's presence of mind. - He and his friends tortured. - Sibata Zabrobi's friendship. - Execution. - Yorinobon's escape by his secretary's suicide. - Gratitude of his posterity. - Ziogoon's purpose of illegal adoption. - Minister's fruitless remonstrances. - Midia's mode of prevention. - Japanese Lucretia. - Minister threatened. - His good-humour. - Test of an accountant's qualifications. - Safe mode of nicknaming a monarch. - Ingenuity of a fisherman. - Its reward. - Artificial mermaid. - Curious mode of trial.

  10. Chapter 10 Attempts of Foreigners to Open Relations with Japan Hospitality towards foreign ships in the 18th century. - American attempts. - Captain Stewart's disasters and schemes. - Baffled. - Shipwrecked Japanese sent from Macao. - Not suffered land. - Russian attempts. - Count Resanoff's embassy. - Difficulties about forms. - About landing and residence. - Overtures rejected. - Difficulties about presents. - Resanoff's resentment. - Hostile invasion. - Consequent degradation of the Prince of Matsmai. - Golownin's expedition. - His capture. - Odd treatment. - Kindness of Japanese after his evasion. - Release. - English attempts. - Sir Stamford Raffles' Pacific Mission. - Foiled by Dutch President. - Present precautions.

  11. Chapter 11 Language, Literature, and Science of the Japanese The language original. - Grammar. - Alphabet. - Variety of written characters. - Their several uses. - Printing. - Books. - Geography. - History. - Moral philosophy. - Encyclopaedias. - Poetry. - Specimens. - Science. - Medical. - Acupuncture and moxa-burning. - Astronomy. - Whimsical measurement and division of time. - Cycles. - Year. - Hours of the day and night. - Odd system of numbering them. - Cloaks. - Civil engineering and mechanics.

  12. Chapter 12 Arts, Manufacturing, Trade and Production of Japan Painting. - Prints. - Casting. - Lackerwork. - Metallurgy. - Sword-blades. - Manufactures. - Trade. - Produce. - Money. - Post. - Ship-building. - Husbandry. - Culture of tea and mode of drying. - Art of dwarfing trees, and of producing enormous-sized vegetables.

  13. Chapter 13 Religion of Japan Sinsyu. - Cosmography. - Celestial and terrestrial gods. - Temples. - No idols. - Future state. - Precepts. - Impurity. - Purification. - Form of worship. - Priests. - Pilgrimages. - Orders of the blind. - Their romantic origin. - Sects. - Buddhism. - Its introduction. - Acts by which established. - Letter from the Corean [Korean] prince. - Tumult by Anti-Buddhists. - Buddhism blended with Sinsyu - Siutoo [Shinto]. - Consequences of the aversion to Christianity. - Present state of the three religions. - Strange story of a former fourth religion resembling Christianity.

  14. Chapter 14 History of Japan Name. - Zin-mu-ten-woo, first Mikado. - Decline of the Mikado's power. - Civil war. - Yoritomo. - His success. - He restores nominal power of the Mikado. - Yoritomo Ziogoon. - Ziogoonship becomes hereditary. - Quarrel with Mongols. - War. - Slaughter of ambassadors. - Peace. - Arrival of the Portuguese. - Success of the Jesuits. - Contentions for the Ziogoonship. - Nobunaga. - Tayko-sama. - Favourite Japanese hero. - His measures of policy. - Death. - Usurpation of Iyeyas. - Persecution of Christians. - Adoption of the present exclusive system. - iyeyas deified as Gongen-sama, the founder of the reigning dynasty of Ziogoons.

  15. Chapter 15 Intercourse Between Japan and China Relations between Japan and China. - Chinese assumption of sovereignty. - Corean narrative of a Japanese embassy to China. - Ambassadors' audience. - Treatment. - Chinese visit to Japan. - Japanese literati in China. - Chinese attempts to establish sovereignty over Japan. - Hideyosi's resentment. - War with China in and for Corea. - Peace. - Commercial and friendly intercourse. - Narrative of Japanese traders. - Their capture. - Treatment in Tartary. - At Pekin. - In Corea. - Their remarks. - Return home. - Formalities.

 
Collation. Full Title: Manners and Customs of the Japanese, in the Nineteenth Century: From the Accounts of Recent Dutch Residents of Japan, and from the German Work of Dr. Ph. Fr. Von Siebold  Illustrated Title Page, Title Page, Advertisement, Preface (3 pages), Contents (5 pages), text (numbered pages 13-286) and Notes (pages 287-298).

 
The same book was issued by Harper's as part of it's "School District Library" series.

Cover from Harper's
"School District Library - No. 149" Edition

 



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